antiseptic
/ˌæntəˈsɛptɪk/
noun
a substance that prevents infection when applied to a wound, especially by killing bacteria
Click to see examples

Examples

1It's a natural antiseptic.
2Trains too were washed down with antiseptic solutions.
3Shine an antiseptic light on injustice with your stories.
4All of these have antiseptic properties.
5Prep the skin with an antiseptic solution.
abortion
/əˈbɔɹʃən/
noun
the intentional ending of a pregnancy, often done during the early stages
Click to see examples

Examples

1abortion is like many other services.
2Is abortion morally permissible?
3Abortion is common.
4Abortion apparently has no long term clinical effects whatsoever.
5Abortion makes a huge difference in the global rate of population growth.
anesthetic
/ˌænəsˈθɛtɪk/
noun
a type of drug that makes the whole or part of the body unable to feel pain when administered
Click to see examples

Examples

1Prior to the case beginning, the anesthesiologist provides the appropriate anesthetic to the patient.
2Patients generally only need local anesthetics.
3So the nurse now will apply a topical anesthetic.
4And - General anesthetics: these act on the central nervous system itself to induce unconsciousness and total lack of sensation.
5The procedure is done under local anesthetic.
blood type
/blˈʌd tˈaɪp/
noun
any of the types into which human blood is divided
Click to see examples

Examples

1Like blood types, we all share only a handful of gut microbiome types across all people.
2My blood type is Y+.
3What is Niall Horan's blood type?
4Give blood irrespective of your blood type.
5- Who asks for blood type?
thermometer
/θɝˈmɑmətɝ/
noun
a device used to measure a person's body temperature to assess for fever or abnormal temperature using various methods like oral, ear, armpit, or forehead readings
Click to see examples

Examples

1Got my thermometer.
2Now, these thermometers accurately predicted the rise in coronavirus hospitalizations.
3Thermapen Mk4 thermometer.
4Thermometers are your friend.
5Most people have thermometers in their homes too.
crutch
/ˈkɹətʃ/
noun
one of a pair of sticks that people with movement difficulties put under their arms to help them walk or stand
Click to see examples

Examples

1She pulls out crutches
2Crutch is going down.
3These crutches are fancy!
4"Here's your crutches."
5- Not to use crutches.
healing
/ˈhiɫɪŋ/
noun
the process of making or becoming healthy once more
Click to see examples

Examples

1Music can also aid healing.
2Healing has to take priority.
3Healing also takes time.
4And trauma requires healing.
5Healing happens in layers.
hospitalization
/ˌhɑspɪtəɫəˈzeɪʃən/
noun
the fact of being placed in a hospital for medical treatment
Click to see examples

Examples

1Hospitalizations are rising as well.
2Hospitalizations, infections, deaths were on the downslope.
3The hospitalizations are at 100,000-plus.
4And hospitalizations are nearing peak levels.
5In 2011, 1 in 10 visits required actual hospitalization.
informed consent
/ɪnfˈɔːɹmd kənsˈɛnt/
noun
permission given by a patient to receive a particular treatment, informed of all the possible consequences and risks
Click to see examples

Examples

1And one of those is informed consent.
2Informed consent includes risks, benefits and alternatives.
3It's informed consent.
4Informed consent is the very bedrock of our understanding of democracy.
5Democracy depends on informed consent.
injection
/ˌɪnˈdʒɛkʃən/
noun
the action of putting a drug into a person's body using a syringe
Click to see examples

Examples

1"Botox injections need a lot of recovery time."
2She needed injections periodically.
3Nobody likes injections.
4"Give her injection."
5I get injection.
placebo
/pɫəˈsiboʊ/
noun
a medicine without any physiological effect that is given to a control group in an experiment to measure the effectiveness of a new drug or to patients who think they need medicine when in reality they do not
Click to see examples

Examples

1Half of them, after treatment, got placebo.
2Placebo effects are very real.
3The rest of the group took a placebo.
4The other group was given a placebo.
5A placebo is a treatment with zero therapeutic value but magical healing power.
remedy
/ˈɹɛmədi/
noun
a treatment or medicine for a disease or to reduce pain that is not severe
Click to see examples

Examples

1- Use this remedy a few times a week.
2- Follow this remedy once daily.
3Also, a good tailor can sometimes remedy structural damage to vintage garments depending on the severity of the damage in question.
4This remedy has 2 major components, turmeric and Ginger, each with its own set of beneficial characteristics.
5We can remedy the situation.
specimen
/ˈspɛsəmən/
noun
a small amount of something such as urine, blood, etc. that is taken for examination
Click to see examples

Examples

1Some specimens grew up to 1.4 meters long.
2Several years later, scientists captured specimens for study.
3Voucher specimens are compensatory, not additive, to mortality rates of certain species.
4In the lab, scientists use frozen specimens this one.
5We collect blood from them, other specimens.
nose job
/nˈoʊz dʒˈɑːb/
noun
a surgical procedure performed on someone's nose that changes its appearance to make it look more attractive
Click to see examples

Examples

1- I wanna give myself a nose job every morning.
2When now did you get a nose job?
3- I said a nose job.
4- I have not had a nose job.
5- I have not had a nose job.
physician
/fəˈzɪʃən/
noun
a medical doctor who specializes in general medicine, not in surgery
Click to see examples

Examples

1Aztec physicians had an extensive anatomical lexicon.
2The ceremony begins with a mock battle between the midwives and the other physicians.
3Of course he likes physicians well-educated.
4Two physicians boarded a flight out of Seattle.
5Average physician sees a patient every 15 minutes.
caregiver
/ˈkɛɹˌɡɪvɝ/
noun
someone who looks after a child or an old, sick, or disabled person at home
Click to see examples

Examples

1My caregiver is my lifeline.
2And caregiver support comes up over and over again.
3And as a result of that, our family became caregivers.
4The caregivers begin with the youngsters of group one.
5Wine and tiny Jahri stick close to their caregiver.
stamina
/ˈstæmənə/
noun
the mental or physical strength that makes one continue doing something hard for a long time
Click to see examples

Examples

1It takes stamina.
2It takes stamina.
3Loses a stamina.
4But their hunters have stamina.
5Their body would need more stamina.
trauma
/ˈtɹɔmə/
noun
a medical condition of the mind caused by extreme shock, which could last for a very long time
Click to see examples

Examples

1Trauma disrupts your health.
2Trauma impacts our comfort.
3And trauma requires healing.
4Today's word is trauma.
5Hoarding implies trauma.
breakdown
/ˈbɹeɪkˌdaʊn/
noun
a condition in which a person becomes so anxious or depressed that they can no longer handle their everyday life
Click to see examples

Examples

1I often have breakdowns.
2Breakdowns can attract attention of the four-legged variety.
3Brad Parr scale has a breakdown.
4A protein-rich diet will complement muscle breakdown.
5Here's the breakdown.
to administer
/ədˈmɪnəstɝ/
verb
to give someone medicines, drugs, etc.
Click to see examples

Examples

1So far, the nation has administered 26 million doses.
2And then the executioner administered two more shocks.
3All right, administer that shot.
4Sometimes, awful people inadvertently administer their own karma.
5Administer an antihistamine and pain reliever.
to cleanse
/ˈkɫɛnz/
verb
to completely clean something, particularly the skin
Click to see examples

Examples

1Cleanse the palate.
2biologically cleanse the world of Yes.
3Even a small amount of garlic can cleanse the liver.
4Cleanse Your Bath With A Grapefruit VOICE OF VIEWER:
5Washing cleanses the viruses from the surface of the food.
to diagnose
/ˌdaɪəɡˈnoʊs/
verb
to find out the cause of a problem or what disease a person has by examining the symptoms
Click to see examples

Examples

1Walters: "MRIs and X-rays can always diagnose your back problem."
2In early March, his doctors diagnosed a kidney stone.
3The biggest problem is diagnosing the disorder in the first place.
4They diagnose certain diseases.
5He diagnosed their flaws.
to vaccinate
/ˈvæksəneɪt/
verb
to protect a person or an animal against a disease by giving them a vaccine
Click to see examples

Examples

1Vaccinate your kids, people.
2Only 11 percent of Brazil's population is fully vaccinated.
3They vaccinated many people.
4So two to vaccinate.
5They vaccinated the kids.
to admit
/ədˈmɪt/
verb
(of a hospital) to take in a patient so that they can receive treatment
Click to see examples

Examples

1Some faithful friends of Stalin even admitted to having disloyal thoughts if not deeds, which was adequate sin to justify execution.
2Even his conservative critics admit.
3In 2014, 7 admitted students self-identified as LGBT on their applications.
4An admission department admits patients.
5Only one of the two candidates admits the existence of systemic racism.
to discharge
/ˈdɪsˌtʃɑɹdʒ/, /dɪsˈtʃɑɹdʒ/
verb
(of a wound or body part) to slowly release an infectious liquid, called pus
Click to see examples

Examples

1- Throat related discharge.
2A discharge was equivalent to death.
3You have honorable discharge.
4Patients are typically discharged 20 to 60 minutes post procedure from the recovery area.
5Discharge is a sign of illness.
to immunize
/ˈɪmjuˌnaɪz/
verb
to protect an animal or a person from a disease by vaccination
Click to see examples

Examples

1So far, nearly 63 percent of U.S. adults are at least partially immunized.
2Now the San Francisco Zoo has immunized 124 mountain yellow-legged frogs.
3Millions of volunteers immunized children around the world against polio.
4Millions of volunteers immunized children around the world against polio.
5Not every child can be immunized.
to stitch
/ˈstɪtʃ/
verb
to join the edges of a wound together by a thread and needle
Click to see examples

Examples

1- Snitches get stitches.
2Snitches get stitches!
3Stitch fix.
4Snitches get stitches.
5- No, straight up wooden pencil, had to get stitches inside and outside of the mouth.
to revive
/ɹiˈvaɪv/, /ɹɪˈvaɪv/
verb
to make a person become conscious again
Click to see examples

Examples

1The Basque languages revived.
2Other regional languages are reviving.
3Revive inside.
4The olive oil moisturizers and revives the skin.
5The quinoa boom revived this village.
to soothe
/ˈsuð/
verb
to reduce the severity of a pain
Click to see examples

Examples

1When he hugged his daughter to soothe his pain, he realized his mistake too late.
2Cool pads soothed her forehead.
3It soothes skin from sun burn and irritation.
4For example, jazz can soothe your mind.
5Babies are soothing.
dumb
/ˈdəm/
adjective
unable to speak
Click to see examples

Examples

1- Celebrities are dumb.
2It sounds dumbs.
3The Boston cover is dumb.
4Muscles are dumb.
5Nowt hat sounds dumb.
pharmaceutical
/ˌfɑɹməˈsutɪkəɫ/
adjective
related to the production, use, or sale of medicines
Click to see examples

Examples

1Airlines do carry pharmaceuticals and vaccines all the time.
2And the pharmaceutical manufacturers then control the patent.
3Now, the pharmaceutical industry spends over $5 billion annually on DTCA.
4So pharmaceuticals are a big chemical industry nowadays.
5- Big pharma, and pharmaceutical companies are making billions of dollars off of all of us.
deaf
/ˈdɛf/
adjective
partly or completely unable to hear
Click to see examples

Examples

1I learned a hard lesson today about the judgment and discrimination and retaliation against people who are deaf or hard of hearing.
2Now, I don't go to the cinema a whole lot because of the lack of real deaf access.
3They can’t imagine being deaf and dealing with the challenges of it.
4Millicent is deaf.
5Some deaf people do not speak at all.
hygiene
/ˈhaɪˌdʒin/
noun
the steps one takes to promote health and avoid disease, particularly by cleaning things or being clean
Click to see examples

Examples

1Your hygiene still matters.
2This girl needs food, hygiene.
3Number one, bad hygiene causes UTIs.
4The law from 1903 relates to hygiene.
5One of the biggest challenges for any relationship is poor hygiene.
to glow
/ˈɡɫoʊ/
verb
(of a person's face) to look lively and healthy, specifically as a result of training and exercising
Click to see examples

Examples

1Some species do glow.
2Powerlines and microwaves will glow!
3The reviews were glowing.
4Glowing skin.
5- Glow.
blues
/ˈbɫuz/
noun
a temporary state of feeling severe sadness and dejection
Click to see examples

Examples

1It's called "A Jazz Man's Blues."
2- It's also my favorite Blues musician.
3the Blues is everywhere.
4I'm the Blues in your left thigh.
5This is positive for the Blues.
sighted
/ˈsaɪtɪd/
adjective
capable of seeing unlike a blind person
Click to see examples

Examples

1That's very short sighted.
2But blankly opposing geoengineering is short sighted.
3Finally, at the end of January 1521, a group of uninhabited small islands were sighted.
4In this case, no vessel was sighted.
5I'm short sighted.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!