to petrify
/ˈpɛtɹəˌfaɪ/
verb
change into stone
Click to see examples

Examples

1My critical bone has petrified.
2I was petrified.
3I was petrified.
4They're petrified.
5I was still petrified.
petrous
/pˈɛtɹəs/
adjective
(of bone especially the temporal bone) resembling stone in hardness

Examples

petulance
/ˈpɛtʃəɫəns/
noun
an irritable petulant feeling
Click to see examples

Examples

1You're signaling petulance
2And when you are growing patient and calm, when your petulances, tempers, and irritabilities are passing away from you, and the more powerful lusts and prejudices cease to dominate and enslave you, then you will know that the divine is awakening within you, that you are drawing near to the eternal Heart, that you are not far from that selfless Love, the possession of which is peace and immortality.
3HE LOSES HIS POWER OF OFFICE AT NOON ON JANUARY 20th, THE REST OF IT IS PETULANCE, AND PAPERWORK, AND IT’S ALL HAPPENING AGAINST THIS GODAWFUL AND UNCONTROLLED PANDEMIC THAT AGAIN TODAY REACHED ANOTHER AWFUL MILESTONE.
4Not for that will I adopt their petulance or folly, even to the extent of being ashamed of it.
5Of course he had made it at a venture, but the coincidence annoyed her, and she spoke with some petulance to the Committee of the Mending Apparatus.
petulant
/ˈpɛtʃəɫənt/
adjective
easily irritated or annoyed
Click to see examples

Examples

1But this time, they weren't organized by petulant children demanding gun control.
2But behind this enlightened statesman lay a guy who just couldn’t stop himself from occasionally acting like a petulant dictator.
3Trump's behavior is that of a petulant autocrat compulsively attacking his enemies by lying about them.
4Trump will prove once again that there is no floor to his petulant nature.
5But while the petulant woman didn't ask to speak to the manager, she did kick up a fuss.
alchemy
/ˈæɫkəmi/
noun
a pseudoscientific forerunner of chemistry in medieval times
Click to see examples

Examples

1These days, alchemy gets a bad rap.
2it is alchemy.
3The transformative power of fire on a simple vegetable is always alchemy.
4Ordinary banks do the alchemy of banking.
5It's Alchemy.
alcoholism
/ˈæɫkəˌhɔˌɫɪzəm/
noun
an intense persistent desire to drink alcoholic beverages to excess
Click to see examples

Examples

1Alcoholism surged.
2You guys handle alcoholism.
3The Irish work force has alcoholism out of control.
4Called alcoholism.
5Alcoholism is a health issue.
lunacy
/ˈɫunəsi/
noun
foolish or senseless behavior
Click to see examples

Examples

1And it's lunacy to separate them.
2What lunacy is this?
3This is lunacy.
4So what's the lunacy?
5Now, that was the story of me then, my good old days of right-wing lunacy.
lunar
/ˈɫunɝ/
adjective
related to the moon
Click to see examples

Examples

1Lunar dust is worse than glitter.
2Lunar cycles are especially important in the sea.
3Lunar eclipse, moon is eclipsed.
4Lunar eclipses occur only during the full moon phase.
5Lunar eclipses occur only during the full moon phase.
lunatic
/ˈɫunəˌtɪk/
noun
an insane person
Click to see examples

Examples

1The lunatics are running the asylum.
2But every movement has a lunatic fringe.
3Crazed lunatics, the Democrats.
4-Every movement has a lunatic fringe.
5A lunatic who they support.
usurious
/juːzjˈʊɹɪəs/
adjective
greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation
Click to see examples

Examples

1This is my track record after my usurious fees, net to investors.
2Or do we have a tendency in the financial world to be usurious?
3If you're just getting married and you don't have any money, go to the usurious guy and ask for the honeymoon loan.
4And we now have a regulator, a new regulator, that's supposed to stomp on these usurious practices.
5While his position in 1274 had been humble, Suenaga enriched himself after the second invasion, primarily through donations people made to a shrine he controlled, and lending seeds at usurious rates.
to usurp
/ˌjuˈsɝp/
verb
seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession
Click to see examples

Examples

1First, I will briefly argue that the Ames test and the respondents' verifiable message test unconstitutionally usurp editorial judgment in violation of this court's reasoning in Miami Herald v. Tornillo.
2A rival male might usurp him and tear his family apart.
3The strong bent of nature is seen in the proportion which this topic of personal relations usurps in the conversation of society.
4Don't usurp your own best interests with other people's best interests.
5You can't usurp its free will without hurting yourself.
usury
/ˈjuzɝi/, /ˈjuʒɝi/
noun
the practice or act of lending money at exorbitant interest rates
Click to see examples

Examples

1They're charging you 17 percent interest rates on your credit card, real usury.
2And so, usury is again on our minds.
3Is that usury?
4So, there are anti usury laws on the books.
5So the Christian Church outlawed usury, called it a mortal sin.
to daunt
/ˈdɔnt/
verb
to cause a person to feel intimidated, scared, or unconfident
Click to see examples

Examples

1- That was daunting.
2The list of unsolved problems in the world is daunting.
3The debt is daunting.
4They're daunting.
5The math is daunting.
daunting
/ˈdɔntɪŋ/
adjective
intimidating, challenging, or overwhelming in a way that creates a sense of fear or unease
Click to see examples

Examples

1The conference committee had a daunting task.
2- Daunting I guess.
3It was very daunting.
4The force and scope of the immunity is pretty daunting.
5Exercise can be quite daunting at times.
dauntless
/dˈɔːntləs/
adjective
invulnerable to fear or intimidation
Click to see examples

Examples

1To this end, the Admiralty directly sought out its most dauntless Post-Captain.
2But Dusty recalibrates his dauntless on the fly.
3But the Dauntless dive bombers use daylight to their advantage.
4In 1942, the Dauntless dive bomber is a newcomer to the Navy, largely untested in battle.
5Set just before the Witcher RPG trilogy during the Second Nilfgaard war, you take on the role of the dauntless dynamic many-layered Queen Meve of Lyria and Rivia.
to scribble
/ˈskɹɪbəɫ/
verb
write carelessly
Click to see examples

Examples

1I scribbled a few things up here.
2The entry was oddly scribbled out in blue ink.
3- It was a scribble.
4He was scribbling with chalk on the pavement.
5- So Milana drew some scribbles.
scribe
/ˈskɹaɪb/
noun
someone employed to make written copies of documents and manuscripts
Click to see examples

Examples

1Scribes painstakingly transcribed the same bibles, devotionals, and stories.
2The Maya scribes wrote thousands of bark books in their hieroglyphic script.
3Instead of scribes, they had recitations.
4With hundreds of years of scribal practice behind them, medieval scribes had amassed a treasure chest of symbols.
5They scribe along a place there.
scriptural
/ˈskɹɪptʃɝəɫ/
adjective
of or pertaining to or contained in or in accordance with the Bible
Click to see examples

Examples

1Even though the Athenians had no written scriptural code and no priesthood, there were a significant number of rituals, observances and offerings that were required.
2Vernon’s natural charisma, his unkempt looks, the down to earth style and his deep scriptural knowledge were a potent mix.
3God is the author of the text, the centrality of Christ as key for scriptural interpretation.
4But Milton does permit himself the closest scriptural version of that fiction, and that's John's image in Revelation 14 of the special heavenly rewards for virgin poets.
5But at the very moment that the Son quotes the Father's scripture, it's almost as if the meaning of this scriptural verse changes before our very eyes.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!