heptagon
/hˈɛptəɡˌɑːn/
noun
(geometry) a flat figure with seven straight sides and seven angles
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Examples

1Importantly, it also works for some polygons with fewer sides, including heptagons, hexagons, and pentagons.
2A heptagon is a shape with how many sides?
3A heptagon, it's not eight, it's not four.
4I did not know there was a such thing as a heptagon.
intricate
/ˈɪntɹəkət/
adjective
having many complex parts or details that make it difficult to understand or work with
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Examples

1Intricate spirals are an orb weaver’s signature design.
2The whole process is very intricate.
3The design has to be intricate.
4My hair washing process is, like really intricate.
5The design has to be intricate.
intricacy
/ˈɪntɹəkəsi/
noun
marked by elaborately complex detail
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Examples

1I don’t follow the intricacies of state television.
2This gets back to the intricacies of science.
3There's a lot of different intricacies about it.
4I love the intricacy of it.
5Here's some more mechanical intricacy.
aesthete
/ˈɛsθit/
noun
one who professes great sensitivity to the beauty of art and nature
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Examples

1Aside from being two of the most-famous lines in English, they also perfectly sum up the Western vision of the emperor: a semi-mythical aesthete living a life of unparalleled elegance.
2He begins as an aesthete.
3I always say he was a scientist, an inventor and an entrepreneur and a CEO, and then an aesthete and a humanist.
4Well, Yeats begins as a Romantic visionary and a late nineteenth-century aesthete, and under the pressure of political and social crisis he breaks with the artificial rhetoric of his early poems and becomes a kind of heroic realist.
5This is Yeats rather later, still dressed, however, in his study as an aesthete and dandy.
aesthetic
/ɛsˈθɛtɪk/
adjective
relating to the enjoyment or appreciation of beauty or art, especially visual art.
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Examples

1It has aesthetics.
2So the main changes here are aesthetic.
3Up on Mount Washington, aesthetics are secondary.
4The aesthetics were the aesthetics of the straight line.
5Is your motivation purely aesthetic?
to rhapsodize
/ˈɹæpsəˌdaɪz/
verb
say (something) with great enthusiasm
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Examples

1Everyone rhapsodized about the big network TV boxing matches of the 1970s and 80s, reasoning that our sport that was once relegated to a dumb cable channel for idiots, like Spike and pay-per-view, would have the cultural importance of Muhammad Ali and Sugar Ray Leonard's historic bouts.
2So, Paley rhapsodized about the remarkable powers of the human body and the different body parts, but even Paley admitted that there are some things which just don't work very well.
3So in this beautiful Victorian prose, Darwin rhapsodizes a bit about the Tree of Life, and it was the only picture he had in his book.
rhapsody
/ˈɹæpsədi/
noun
(in ancient Greece) an epic poem adapted for recitation
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Examples

1"Bohemian Rhapsody" sucks.
2This is from Bohemian Rhapsody.
3We have the original Rhapsody in Blue.
4- It's Bohemian Rhapsody.
5so by freddie mercury queen and its bohemian rhapsody the song is actually Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen
to convolve
/kənvˈɑːlv/
verb
curl, wind, or twist together
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Examples

1The next layer might have neurons that convolve on those edge features to recognize simple shapes, comprised of edges, like corners.
2A layer beyond that might convolve on those corner features, and contain neurons that can recognize simple objects, like mouths and eyebrows.
3And then each of these will be convolved with the input image and give rise to a different feature map.
convolution
/ˈkɑnvəˌɫuʃən/
noun
the action of coiling or twisting or winding together
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Examples

1Convolution is just the fancy word for sums.
2And so the result is a convolution operation.
3Another interesting variant is the dilated convolution.
4So you've seen 2D convolutions in the previous lectures for images.
5And then we can apply 3D convolution.
convoluted
/ˈkɑnvəˌɫutəd/
adjective
rolled longitudinally upon itself
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Examples

1The delusions can get very convoluted.
2And so sometimes, the language itself will get very convoluted.
3Usually it's convoluted.
4It's really convoluted
5but it's pretty convoluted.
forefather
/ˈfɔɹˌfɑðɝ/
noun
the founder of a family
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Examples

1- Jessica, our immigrant forefathers have the same issue.
2Paying a price for our forefathers.
3I have the strength of my forefathers.
4The tiny spike on the left to the center is actually the forefather of wheat.
5The forefathers of the early environmental movement like John Muir, Gifford Pinchot and Teddy Roosevelt were carving out wild spaces in the United States for the enjoyment of all Americans.
foreground
/ˈfɔɹˌɡɹaʊnd/
noun
the part of a scene, photograph, etc. that is closest to the observer
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Examples

1The film foregrounds tourist infrastructure, roads, cars, boats, tents, mountain lodges, as much as the scenery of the park.
2I can lighten up the foreground no problem.
3The device foregrounds Moore's concision and practicality.
4Have a foreground, a background, all in beautiful proportion.
5The summit would be in the foreground.
malcontent
/ˌmæɫkənˈtɛnt/
adjective
discontented as toward authority
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Examples

1He remained a cantankerous, grumpy malcontent until the very end.
2This malcontent paved the way for Batista’s return to the island, this time as a Senator, in 1948.
3The mother might have been a pill-popping malcontent married to a tyrannical man whose yearning for success dehumanized him, but that shouldn’t have resulted in them both being shot to pieces.
4It is said that every American carries in their bloodstream, the heritage of a malcontent, or a dreamer.
malediction
/mˌælɪdˈɪkʃən/
noun
the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult)

Examples

malefactor
/ˈmæɫˌfæktɝ/, /ˈmæɫəˌfæktɝ/
noun
someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
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Examples

1What stands between such malefactors and the destruction of our common purpose are people like you, who have an experience of learning through difference courageously stand up for the rights of those who are targeted.
2What stands between such malefactors and the destruction of our common purpose are people like you who, having experienced learning through difference, courageously stand up for the rights of those who are targeted.
3But when I returned from hunting in Africa with Kermit and touring Europe, when I toured the country with Pin Sho, who himself had been fired by President Taft, well, I discovered that President Taft had returned my republican party and our federal government back over to those men that I called the malefactors of great wealth, the special interests on Wall Street.
maleficent
/mˈeɪlfɪsənt/
adjective
harmful or evil in intent or effect
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Examples

1Maleficent, come over.
2Maybe Maleficent could sign the little petition.
3Who am I maleficent?
4Yeah, Maleficent has a staff.
5- Maleficent has a staff.
malevolent
/məˈɫɛvəɫənt/
adjective
having or exerting a malignant influence
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Examples

1I'm malevolent.
2- It's his malevolent stink.
3Sounds mighty malevolent, doesn't it?
4There is nothing malevolent about it.
5- What's malevolent glare?
malfeasance
/ˌmæɫˈfizəns/
noun
an illegal or unjust act committed by a person of high standing
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Examples

1He was a unique combination of incompetence and malfeasance.
2The malfeasance is real.
3You can find cases of scientific malfeasance, falsification of experiments, unfair criticisms, so on.
4Should the NRA be dissolved for malfeasance or is it a political witch hunt?
5Mere bribery probably understates the magnitude of the malfeasance here.
malicious
/məˈɫɪʃəs/
adjective
behaving in a way that is cruel and very unkind or intended to hurt people
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Examples

1So one of the main issues in the 2016 election was malicious advertising on Facebook.
2These hackers are very malicious.
3They're running malicious software.
4That's not malicious.
5Sometimes it's definitely malicious.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!