marine
/mɝˈin/
adjective
related to the sea and the different life forms that exist there
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Examples

1These days, marine generalists include many species of sharks and dolphins.
2Marines have already used the headsets for training simulations.
3- That white hat gave you Marine training.
4Marines fire a total of fifty rounds at targets at 200, 300, and 500 meters away from the standing, kneeling, sitting, and prone positions.
5Marines must read history, some biographies, and lots about war.
maritime
/ˈmɛɹəˌtaɪm/
adjective
relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamen
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Examples

1It's a commercial Maritime.
2Building a Maritime Power
3It was a maritime quarantine.
4The Titanic disaster is the most famous maritime tragedy in history.
5The other name for this is French maritime pine.
contumacious
/kɑːntuːmˈeɪʃəs/
adjective
wilfully obstinate; stubbornly disobedient

Examples

contumacy
/kəntˈuːməsi/
noun
willful refusal to appear before a court or comply with a court order; can result in a finding of contempt of court

Examples

contumelious
/kɑːntuːmˈɛlɪəs/
adjective
arrogantly insolent

Examples

contumely
/kəntˈuːmli/
noun
a rude expression intended to offend or hurt
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Examples

1It covers "all written communications that tend to expose one to public hatred, shame, obloquy, contumely, odium, contempt, ridicule, aversion, ostracism, degradation, or disgrace, and to induce an evil opinion of one in the minds of right-thinking persons and to deprive one of their confidence and friendly intercourse in society."
neolithic
/ˈnioʊˌɫɪθɪk/
adjective
of or relating to the most recent period of the Stone Age (following the mesolithic)
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Examples

1You can cut Greek's public spending to Neolithic levels.
2I think the neolithic period.
3Neolithic burials often show the scars of stone age existence, a life spent under the constant threat of violence and disease.
4Human beings already lived here in the Neolithic period, over 4,000 years ago.
5Human beings already lived here in the Neolithic period, over 4,000 years ago.
neologism
/niːˈoʊlədʒˌɪzəm/
noun
the process of inventing a word
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Examples

1Now, I know that sounds like a zen koan, or some neologism from Orwell's "1984."
2Well, there's no shortage of art in that process-- recombination of morphemes, neologism, resurrection.
3To hazard a neologism from the Greek prefix for gold, we could call what some AfD promote an oro-patriotism a national feeling whose referent is not this or that territory, ethnos, or language, but whichever monetary system backs its currency with the precious metal that they perceive to be the natural currency of modern humanity.
4Josephus has already designated the form of Judean government, again politeuma, via an apparent neologism as a theocracy, theokratia, rule by God.
5Also, they refer to this party as a soiree many times and this french neologism seems way out of place.
neology
/niːˈoʊlədʒi/
noun
the act of inventing a word or phrase
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Examples

1they're all spirals really like the-- since Dante thinks of the cosmos as a book and we would call it a cosmobook, that's a neology that I coin here, a kind of cosmobook.
neonate
/nˈiːoʊnˌeɪt/
noun
a recently born organism, especially a newborn baby or an animal
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Examples

1Neonatologists specialize in the care of neonates, which are infants less than 4 weeks old.
2Many congenital cardiac operations must be done as soon as the neonate is born, which means working on a heart the size of a golf ball.
3If someone is having a baby and they have an active chlamydia infection, it can be transmitted to the neonates eyes and this is actually one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide.
4This one is looking at ten neonates born to mothers with COVID 19 and Again, they were swabbing.
5They did pharyngeal swabs in nine of the ten neonates One to nine days after birth and found that all of them showed negative results again.
neophyte
/ˈniəˌfaɪt/
noun
any new participant in some activity
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Examples

1I'm a total neophyte.
2The morning of the consecration ceremony I arrive at the Ganesha Temple at 4:00 AM, and I find Dando, a neophyte priest, giggling with excitement, sporting a gigantic crash helmet with a radio receiver.
3But irrespective of what a neophyte he was, he still clobbered more baseballs than any other infielder of any age since Jimmie Foxx 58 years earlier.
4It may be a long time into a love affair or working relationship before we realise that we are unwittingly dealing with an emotional neophyte.
5Disillusionment should stand at the world's entrance and should place himself immediately at the shoulder of the neophyte, to free him from the dangers that lie in wait for him.
rhetoric
/ˈɹɛtɝɪk/
noun
the study of the rules and different methods of using language in a way that is effective
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Examples

1Of course rhetoric is a real discipline.
2He changed the rhetoric.
3Its rhetoric is bone-chilling.
4Rhetoric, the art of organizing the world of words to maximum effect.
5They use his rhetoric.
rhetorician
/ˌɹɛtɝˈɪʃən/
noun
a person who delivers a speech or oration
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Examples

1He too, appears as a rhetorician.
2A rhetorician, as we say of men who believed that politics and rhetoric go hand in hand.
3From the very beginning, Ulysses is a philosopher and he is a rhetorician.
4He's a great rhetorician.
5Apollos is depicted in Acts as a great rhetorician.
to annihilate
/əˈnaɪəˌɫeɪt/
verb
kill in large numbers
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Examples

1A nihilist, annihilate?
2The Jin army and their commander were annihilated.
3All forms of life close to the plants would be annihilated.
4We just annihilated this box of chocolates.
5- Annihilated.
to annul
/ˈænəɫ/
verb
to officially cancel a marriage
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Examples

1Garibaldi had the marriage immediately annulled.
2Interestingly, shortly before the sentence was carried out on May 19, 1536, her marriage to King Henry was annulled as he claimed that he had never been legally married to her.
3And accordingly in May of 1533 Cranmer assembled a court, annulled Henry's marriage to Katherine of Aragon.
4The marriage was annulled in July.
5It is used to erase the vibratory cellular memory of a particular antigen, thus it annuls the body's allergic response to that antigen altogether.
annunciation
/ɐnˌʌnsɪˈeɪʃən/
noun
a formal public statement
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Examples

1There is some evidence of the annunciation of his birth, and some signal that he is divinely chosen.
2So an icon doesn't have a depiction of the Annunciation or a depiction of events.
3There's almost no annunciation.
4There's that over annunciation of the vocals.
5Look at the annunciation, on my mouth.
to defile
/dɪfˈaɪl/
verb
spot, stain, or pollute
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Examples

1People had defiled the room, the building.
2- Don't defile my gratin.
3Very severe moral impurity defiles the innermost areas of the sanctuary as well as the land.
4The land is also defiled by illicit homicide.
5Idolatry also defiles the land.
to defraud
/dɪˈfɹɔd/
verb
to cheat someone by using deception or dishonesty, usually for financial gain
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Examples

1Just years after its executives perpetrated what might be one of the worst examples of corporate malfeasance in automotive history, the American people, the EPA and their counterparts around the world have been defrauded by Volkswagen.
2He defrauded $1 million in 1890s money before being caught.
3The company was charged with defrauding safety regulators after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.
4They may be defrauded in certain unscrupulous transactions.
5To lie and defraud your own personal client?

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!