phonetic
/fəˈnɛtɪk/
adjective
of or relating to speech sounds
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Examples

1- Forget the phonetic thing, sir.
2For example someone with a lisp has a phonetic disorder.
3Some use phonetics, and they use the International Phonetic Alphabet.
4english isn't phonetic.
5He discovered the phonetic value of most hieroglyphs.
phonic
/ˈfɑnɪk/
adjective
of or relating to speech sounds
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Examples

1Maybe my age mates were not hooked on phonics but I was.
2Yeah, I was hooked on phonics.
3Hooked on Phonics?
4Wow, aren't we "Hooked on Phonics?"
5But we have been practicing his numbers and phonics.
phonogram
/fˈɑːnəɡɹˌæm/
noun
any written symbol standing for a sound or syllable or morpheme or word
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Examples

1- Is there a record on the phonogram?
2- There is a record on the phonogram.
3- Is it a crank phonogram, do you just crank it up?
4Writer, artist team Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie have had a number of amazing collaborations together like Young Avengers and Phonogram:
5River crab is héxiè, is the phonogram for harmonization, for censorship.
phonology
/fəˈnɑɫəˌdʒi/
noun
the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
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Examples

1These patterns, and the study of them, is known as phonology.
2An appreciation for phonology is useful whatever your environment.
3So we're going to have our basic phonology.
4But what you don't find in any real sense is phonology, morphology, syntax, combinatorial systems or arbitrary names.
5Phonology is sounds.
sublingual
/sˈʌblɪŋɡwəl/
adjective
beneath the tongue
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Examples

1And there are some people that use sublingual drops, you put them on the tongue, which works sort of the same way.
2There's a similar mode of administration called sublingual or buckle.
3They have these little sublingual microdots you put under your tongue and dissolve in your mouth and do that once or twice a week, and the B12 issue is solved.
4But I found that once I started getting B12 shots, you could also buy them in sublingual form that you hold under your tongue, I found that my energy went up a lot.
submarine
/ˈsəbmɝˌin/, /ˌsəbmɝˈin/
noun
a warship that can operate both on and under water
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Examples

1I boarded the submarine.
2Submarines are different in purpose to some other elements of a navy.
3So we take the submarine away from the shoreline.
4But, submarines are now so much more than machines of war.
5Can you say submarine?
to submerge
/səbˈmɝdʒ/
verb
sink below the surface; go under or as if under water
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Examples

1Man: Chief of the watch, submerge the ship to 160 feet.
2Our sandals are submerged.
3- Submerged.
4Peel several large russet potatoes and store submerged in a bowl of room temperature water.
5Fully submerge the item in cold water.
submersible
/səbˈmɝsɪbəɫ/
adjective
capable of being immersed in water or functioning while submerged
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Examples

1This is a submersible pump.
2The submersible has now reached a depth of 500 meters.
3It's submersible.
4We went up to them with our submersible.
5I've made hundreds of dives in submersibles.
submersion
/səbˈmɝʒən/
noun
the act of wetting something by submerging it
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Examples

1All right, I have complete submersion.
2Now this is also IP68 certified - six meters for up to 30 minutes, as far as water submersion.
3Then the IP68 is full submersion at one and a half meters, which of course would require all of the flaps on the phone to be closed in order to survive.
4Instead of submersion, it's a high pressure and temperature water jet test.
5Note 7 has an IP rating of 68, which means that it is totally protected against dust, And continues submersion in water.
calibre
/kˈælɪbɚ/
noun
a degree or grade of excellence or worth
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Examples

1He woke up screaming at night and slept with a loaded calibre 45 pistol nearby.
2Please welcome Calibre 50.
3Oh so here are the unis Look at that high calibre packaging right there
4And here's a USP for a car of this calibre.
5And this high calibre of contacts could be the most significant reason ivy league graduates are more financially successful than their peers.
to calibrate
/ˈkæɫəˌbɹeɪt/
verb
make fine adjustments or divide into marked intervals for optimal measuring
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Examples

1So does that then calibrate these differences?
2Also the screen is calibrated from the factory.
3Do you calibrate microscopes?
4Who calibrated this thing?
5For example, you can calibrate alcohol.
to accuse
/əkˈjuz/
verb
to claim that someone has done something wrong
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Examples

1Once an ally to Erdoğan, Gülen’s media outlets have accused the president of corruption.
2So the king's wife Jezebel falsely accuses the man of blasphemy.
3An environmental activist from the disaster area accuses the mine operator of negligence.
4So far seven women have accused the governor of sexual harassment of various kinds.
5- Accused an innocent victim.
accusation
/ˌækjəˈzeɪʃən/, /ˌækjuˈzeɪʃən/
noun
a formal charge of wrongdoing brought against a person; the act of imputing blame or guilt
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Examples

1Accusations like, "You are cheating."
2I have no accusations.
3Accusations of ballots flown in from South Korea.
4His accusations are very serious.
5Any accusations against the monarchy are accusations against their family.
bereft
/bɝˈɛft/
adjective
(of people) feeling very lonely and sorrowful, particularly as a result of a loss
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Examples

1And I think that bereft of the real heart connection with both mothers when it mattered, that Steve just kept building wealth to compensate.
2Arnold’s life after his betrayal was, fittingly, bereft of any triumphs.
3he's kinda bereft by the other character, Runt, leaving him and it sends him into this spiral of kind of, of violence and self-destruction, really. -
4It causes the bereft lionesses quickly to come into season.
5Dolly Parton appeared to be completely bereft when her friend and collaborator Kenny Rogers passed away on March 20th at the age of 81.
to bereave
/bɝˈiv/
verb
deprive through death
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Examples

1And you talked about this idea about language, and I thought about hip hop and what hip hop is, this idea that people bereaved of language, right, would go on to develop and create and master a kind of language and to use it under a sort of extraordinary pressure that would generate something that was so magnificent that it would change the way in which language is spoken around the world.
2And you talked about this idea about language, and I thought about hip hop and what hip hop is, this idea that people bereaved of language, right, would go on to develop and create and master a kind of language and to use it under a sort of extraordinary pressure that would generate something that was so magnificent that it would change the way in which language is spoken around the world.
3The privileged are aggrieved or their eyes are deceived and another family is bereaved.
4White as an angel is the English child, But I am black, as if bereaved of light.
5"What we love that we have, but by desire we bereave ourselves of the love."
irrelevant
/ˌɪˈɹɛɫəvənt/
adjective
unimportant or having no connection with something
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Examples

1Your feelings are irrelevant.
2Title is irrelevant.
3Whether or not you like the music is irrelevant.
4The timing of the separation is irrelevant.
5The question is irrelevant.
irreligious
/ɪɹɪlˈɪdʒəs/
adjective
hostile or indifferent to religion
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Examples

1Thales was not, however, irreligious.
2Fundamentally, there are no irreligious people.
3Otherwise, the rest are mostly agnostic or irreligious with a noticeable community of Muslims, mostly from the huge Turkish and Middle Eastern communities at about 5 %, as well as a few Jews, Buddhists, and Hindus rounding up the remainder 1 %.
4Although most people in the country are generally irreligious, or adhere to traditional faiths and ideologies like Confucianism and Taoism, there are still a surprisingly solid community of people that have faith backgrounds.
5'You think it irreligious of me to have found out a way of my own.
irreparable
/ˌɪˈɹɛpɝəbəɫ/
adjective
impossible to repair, rectify, or amend
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Examples

1We are doing irreparable harm to Earth's biodiversity.
2After that it is pretty much irreparable, the damage.
3That is irreparable The wife of the ex governor of Indiana was diagnosed with glioblastoma Same brain tumor Ted.
4But if you let this persist for too long, you will cause irreparable damage to the plant.
5Such sharp temperature changes can do irreparable damage.
irrepressible
/ˌɪɹəˈpɹɛsəbəɫ/
adjective
impossible to repress or control
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Examples

1He's irrepressible.
2And this array of arguments, they all get kind of lumped under this heading, irrepressible conflict thesis, began to flow from American historians.
3It's not that this was in my view an irrepressible conflict.
4During his childhood, Vickers was never labeled a maniac, a young man with an irrepressible urge to hurt people.
5He has an irrepressible love for performing, but it turns out that William Hung also has quite the analytical mind.
irreproachable
/ɪɹɪpɹˈoʊtʃəbəl/
adjective
free of guilt; not subject to blame
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Examples

1Beyond this, his youth must be innocent of crime and chaste, his conduct irreproachable and his hands stainless.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!