to adjudge
/əˈdʒədʒ/
verb
to declare something true or to be the case according to facts
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Examples

1- Two-thirds of the Senators present not having pronounced him guilty, the Senate adjudges that the respondent, William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States, is not guilty as charged.
2Now of course, here Adams says that really striking thing-- and then he's careful to add right after it that, quote, "For opposing a threatened tyranny we have been not only called, but in effect adjudged rebels and traitors to the best of kings."
3So one comes to the conclusion that levulose must be adjudged to have one of the following two constitutional formulae.
to adjudicate
/əˈdʒudɪˌkeɪt/
verb
bring to an end; settle conclusively
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Examples

1We are adjudicating a number of comments that did come through in the public period.
2You have to adjudicate intention in the individual case.
3But here, at the acceptance of a felony guilty plea, guilt is actually adjudicated.
4And over time, different things will be adjudicated.
5Today we are adjudicating the case of Tfue versus FaZe Clan.
treachery
/ˈtɹɛtʃɝi/
noun
betrayal of a trust
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Examples

1Her treachery will not go unpunished.
2The question of treachery is different.
3Treachery is the language of nothing.
4Also with treachery in mind, Han military appointments were not permanent.
5The Clinton papers reveal the depth of Arnold's treachery.
treacherous
/ˈtɹɛtʃɝəs/
adjective
dangerously unstable and unpredictable
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Examples

1The journey alone is treacherous.
2The journey is treacherous.
3A series of trenches so treacherous they earned the nickname The Devil’s Wood.
4A snowy environment can be treacherous.
5The richest seas on Earth can be treacherous.
to allay
/əˈɫeɪ/
verb
satisfy (thirst)
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Examples

1What fragrant balm allay all qualms and angst war spawns?
2This seemed to allay all anxieties.
3But their floor manager always allayed their fears, and Sochocky himself explained that the small quantities of radium were quite innocuous.
4It allays a feverish thirst that had parched me for many days.
5The government will formally withdraw the bill in order to fully allay public concerns.
to alleviate
/əˈɫiviˌeɪt/
verb
to help ease mental or physical pain
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Examples

1High-end laptops alleviate this problem with a MUX, or multiplexer.
2Ginger alleviates pain thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties.
3Watermelons, cucumbers, and a few berries can alleviate the pain.
4Ginger alleviates extreme symptoms of dysmenorrhea.
5Alleviate any tension with some good-natured jokes.
alliance
/əˈɫaɪəns/
noun
an association between countries, organizations, political parties, etc. in order to achieve common interests
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Examples

1The alliance would include business partnerships, joint ventures, and investments.
2Do demogorgons make strategic alliances?
3Alliances are force multipliers for us.
4They form alliances.
5Across the world, these alliances gave the US strength.
detriment
/ˈdɛtɹəmənt/
noun
a damage or loss
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Examples

1Cancellations are a detriment to the host's bottom line.
2We can see performance detriment.
3There are benefits and detriments.
4There's also a detriment there.
5It becomes a detriment, instead of a benefit.
detrimental
/ˌdɛtɹəˈmɛnəɫ/, /ˌdɛtɹəˈmɛntəɫ/
adjective
(sometimes followed by `to') causing harm or injury
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Examples

1Cigarettes are 'detrimental to your health'.
2The adjective is detrimental.
3The infection was detrimental to her recovery.
4Sleep deprivation is also detrimental to our health and well-being.
5Distress on the other hand, is detrimental to health and well-being.
detritus
/ˈdɛtɹətəs/, /dɪˈtɹaɪtəs/
noun
the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
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Examples

1These levels are littered with detritus.
2Pieces of broken detritus are coming back through time, implying mass destruction from some future global conflict.
3But unfortunately, there is a small concentration of contaminant within this detritus.
4What you find when you actually open up Pynchon's novels is an incredibly rich world of human detritus, of history.
5This acts as a protective layer against detritus while underwater.
pedagogics
/pˌɛdɐɡˈɑːɡɪks/
noun
the principles and methods of instruction

Examples

pedagogue
/pˈɛdɐɡˌɑːɡ/
noun
someone who educates young people
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Examples

1And I had a very early board member at ART say to me, Diane, your job is to be a pedagogue.
2It was this thing that came into the cosmos as an invader, it enslaved humanity, it was the pedagogue that swatted humanity down when humanity was in its childish state.
3Does anybody have pedagogue in your Greek translation there at 3:24?
4The pedagogue's mouth watered as he looked upon this sumptuous promise of luxurious winter fare.
5The hair of the affrighted pedagogue rose upon his head with terror.
pedagogy
/ˈpɛdəˌɡoʊdʒi/
noun
the profession of a teacher
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Examples

1Is it novel pedagogy?
2So, as an architect and a teacher, I've been investigating through design and design pedagogy the relations between space and memory, between architecture and memory.
3[END PLAYBACK] JEFF DUNCAN-ANDRADE: That's-- that's master pedagogy.
4His work focuses on history, memory, pedagogy, and sociolinguistics, among other topics.
5That was an intrusion into the pedagogy.
scruple
/ˈskɹupəɫ/
noun
an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action
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Examples

1The wily peanut, with its superior intellect and lack of scruples, was able to get the upper hand on the early man.
2Robby is routinely thrashed by fellow inmates in juvenile detention until he abandons his Miyagi-Do scruples and stands up for himself in a violent fashion.
3There's no moral scruple.
4Never one for scruples, Zhilong was quick to accept, and his fleet of lightly-armed Chinese junks were quickly converted into high powered warships.
5And the market to be exploited by people with few scruples.
scrupulous
/ˈskɹupjəɫəs/
adjective
having scruples; arising from a sense of right and wrong; principled
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Examples

1There are, of course, less scrupulous means of getting books into people’s hands.
2He is a man of scrupulous honesty and integrity.
3They have a reputation for their strict monotheism, their scrupulous avoidance of foreign gods.
4And the art museum here is very scrupulous, as is the MFA downtown, as are many museums at this point about actually looking at the provenance of their works and trying to hand over works that they believe have been stolen.
5In pursuance of Dupin’s suggestion, I made scrupulous examination of the affair of the affidavits.
haste
/ˈheɪst/
noun
overly eager speed (and possible carelessness)
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Examples

1Haste makes waste.
2Finally, make haste.
3Make haste!
4The boatswain made haste to the sailor’s berth.
5So make haste!
to hasten
/ˈheɪsən/
verb
move hurridly
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Examples

1Outside of the markets, the current wave of litigation against oil and gas companies could also hasten a shift in both public perception and policy.
2Immediately, the king hastened to the riverbank.
3Behavior like this hastens the modern suspicion of any ritual behavior.
4Hastens are known for this weightless feeling.
5This circumstance hastened matters.
equine
/ˈiˌkwaɪn/
adjective
resembling a horse
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Examples

1Equine therapy can even help people boost self-esteem or cope with social stress.
2Voluntary Services offered equine therapy and yoga as in-home services.
3Where does this delightful equine tradition take place?
4- Oh, my God, I'll be your equine godmother.
5Equine veterinarians work with horses involved in performing, farming and racing.
equestrian
/ɪˈkwɛstɹiən/
adjective
of or relating to or featuring horseback riding
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Examples

1His aunt was a Spinoza-quoting equestrian sorceress.
2And I'm showing you the largest equestrian sculpture in the country.
3She was an expert equestrian, a crack shot, an Olympic-level skier.
4So, Philip inherited a rich equestrian tradition among his elites.
5House- his equestrian statue has all four hooves are on the ground.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!