eloquence
/ˈɛɫəkwəns/
noun
the ability to deliver a clear and strong message
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Examples

1Eloquence was not one of them.
2The sullen grunts of early adolescence can give way to the enormous eloquence of the poetry, diaries and songs of later teenagehood.
3There was no eloquence about it.
4First, at the university, he established his reputation for eloquence.
5Initially, her beauty, eloquence, and personality endeared the people to her.
eloquent
/ˈɛɫəkwənt/
adjective
able to utilize language to convey something well, especially in a persuasive manner
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Examples

1Anomalies are incredibly eloquent.
2Probably more eloquent way to say that,
3She gave an eloquent speech at the gala dinner.
4She's so eloquent.
5He was sharp, eloquent.
eloquently
/ˈɛɫəkwəntɫi/
adverb
in a way that utilizes language to send a strong and clear message, especially when one is speaking in public
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Examples

1But other people do that very eloquently.
2Zimmer more eloquently pointed out the real reason hires like this hurt.
3Or: He spoke eloquently about his journey of personal development.
4It speaks so eloquently to the problem.
5You've talked very eloquently about Victor Frankel.
esteem
/əˈstim/
noun
the level of respect and admiration that one has for someone or something
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Examples

1Over time, The Shining's esteem evolved.
2So, the symptoms of co-dependents are, low-self esteem.
3Money was great, respect, esteem.
4Like, the key to all of this is building self esteem.
5I had self esteem.
to esteem
/əˈstim/
verb
to greatly admire or respect someone or something
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Examples

1Over time, The Shining's esteem evolved.
2So, the symptoms of co-dependents are, low-self esteem.
3Money was great, respect, esteem.
4Like, the key to all of this is building self esteem.
5I had self esteem.
to express
/ɪksˈpɹɛs/
verb
to show or make a thought, feeling, etc. known by looks, words, or actions
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Examples

1The two young lovers express their passion through and amid the beauties of nature.
2In the long-term the kiss expresses a connection between people.
3But the real cross of Christ-- The cross expresses the great love of God for man.
4Many environmentalists have expressed concern about these powerful electromagnetic networks and their impact on the air and public safety.
5Express elevator.
expression
/ɪksˈpɹɛʃən/
noun
the act of showing one’s ideas or feelings through words or actions
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Examples

1Hitler carefully practiced his speaking, looking at himself in the mirror as he rehearsed and tried out various poses, and gestures, and facial expressions.
2It changes expressions.
3All of these get expressions.
4The ideas of religious liberty and freedom of conscience merely gave expression to the sway of free competition within the domain of knowledge.
5I think expression.
fair hearing
/fˈɛɹ hˈɪɹɪŋ/
noun
the act of giving both sides of an argument a fair chance to express their opinions about something
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Examples

1Due process means the government can't take your life, liberty or property without a fair hearing, which is written in the fifth amendment.
2You have to give a fair hearing to everybody, and you can't give a fair hearing if you’ve already made up your mind.
3You have to give a fair hearing to everybody, and you can't give a fair hearing if you’ve already made up your mind.
4They do not object to paying their share to defray Crown expenses, and, if there are particular grievances, they trust that their objections will be given a fair hearing by Parliament and the Crown.
5You want them to get a fair hearing.
favorability
/ˌfævɝəˈbɪɫɪti/
noun
the degree to which someone or something is accepted or considered appealing
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Examples

1Cuomo's favorability rating dipped down to 40% in April of 2021, but there was another scandal emerging.
2It affects more people than any other federal program, and has one of the highest favorability ratings.
3His favorability ratings dropped to 22 percent, lower than any other post-WWII president.
4When Hillary stepped down as secretary of state in 2013, she had the highest favorability rating of any secretary of state save one since those opinion polls were introduced in 1948.
5While Putin’s favorability ratings were slipping because of a struggling economy.
favorable
/ˈfeɪvɝəbəɫ/, /ˈfeɪvɹəbəɫ/
adjective
describing something that is liked or approved
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Examples

1Were they favorable?
2The situation became less favorable for the Gauls.
3The conditions are favorable.
4Twenty four and 80 percent of Republicans have favorable opinions of Trump.
5Narcissists will often expect favorable treatment from those around them.
favorably
/ˈfeɪvɝəbɫi/, /ˈfeɪvɹəbɫi/
adverb
in a manner that displays approval
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Examples

1Everything, right now, has worked out so favorably.
2It doesn't compare favorably.
3And courts have traditionally responded favorably to these arguments.
4In the English common law tradition, libel in private enterprise generally found favorably to plaintiffs.
5Received very favorably by business.
to feed back
/fˈiːd bˈæk/
verb
to give information or constructive suggestions about something, particularly with regard to improvement

Examples

to feel
/ˈfiɫ/
verb
to hold a particular opinion or attitude or have a feeling that something might be the case without a justifiable reason
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Examples

1When he finally went on his sleepy way home, Tom felt sure that he had just made an excellent new friend.
2About five thousand people live in The City, and at weekends it feels empty.
3Did that description almost make you feel as queasy as Billie?
4But this just kind of feels like a hideous way to lose your sword.
5Now this feels like a dead weight like a dumbbell I'm pushing around.
feeling
/ˈfiɫɪŋ/
noun
a belief or opinion that is inspired by one's emotions rather than facts
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Examples

1So that feeling actually triggers physical responses just like other needs in your body.
2Feelings follow thoughts.
3Because thoughts create feelings.
4Sinking feeling.
5And most especially: - Making feelings facts.
to find
/ˈfaɪnd/
verb
to have a particular opinion or feeling about something that makes one regard it in a specified way
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Examples

1After a while, companies wanted to find a way to include more information in the bar code.
2Then he drove into London, but he didn't find his hotel.
3Ellen, please ask a maid to find some dry clothes for me, and then I'll go on to the village.
4An improvised explosive device has been found at the Capitol.
5His suggestions never made any impact, until King Leopold II found Stanley’s work.
to find one's voice
/fˈaɪnd wˈʌnz vˈɔɪs/
phrase
to be able to speak and express oneself, particularly in a difficult situation or circumstance

Examples

to flatter
/ˈfɫætɝ/
verb
to believe something favorable about one's character or abilities even though it might not be true
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Examples

1Dear Kuruvata, beards, like glasses, must flatter face shapes.
2The rest is a little bit flatter.
3Flattering him.
4Flatter him.
5Flatter him.
to flip-flop
/flˈɪpflˈɑːp/
verb
to make an abrupt change of opinion or policy, especially in an exchange with the opposing one
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Examples

1My sons are only wearing flip-flops.
2People had t-shirts, shorts, flip-flops.
3There's no flip-flop.
4Today, probably the most popular sandals are flip-flops.
5It does a flip-flop.
forceful
/ˈfɔɹsfəɫ/
adjective
(of people or opinions) strong and demanding in manner
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Examples

1More forceful contractions, equals more strength and power.
2The president had some forceful opinions too.
3This student was very forceful.
4The muscles of your chest cage, abdomen, and diaphragm undergo a forceful contraction.
5By contrast, the moral luck principle is also really forceful.
forcefulness
/ˈfɔɹsfəɫnəs/
noun
a person's ability to express their ideas and beliefs in a persuasive and assertive manner
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Examples

1And the forcefulness, assertiveness, of statements coming from women of color really on display, I think, with Indra Nooyi.
2So again, the degree of forcefulness, the degree of edginess, you can show as a woman of color really constrained by bias, by these stereotypes, and the archetypes of the leadership.
3Yeltsin, who had many, many good qualities, and who I think in his bones was a democrat, lacked at the end of the day the force and the forcefulness to really see his agenda through, because of a lot of his own personal and physical frailties.
for my money
/fɔːɹ maɪ mˈʌni/
phrase
used to express one's opinions or beliefs
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Examples

1And creating this perception, which is quite real actually, that the per ounce cost of something bigger is lower, and so I'm just getting better value for my money, forget the fact that I'm buying 32 ounces of soda, which has half a cup of sugar.
2Well nucleic acids are the fourth major group of biological molecules, and for my money they have the most complicated job of all.
3and I think he's just using me for my money.
4So if I were to analyze myself for my money, if I'm getting the best return, I am a person who loves my family and I love sharing experiences with them around food.
5Obviously, a great man, (Bill laughs) a huge influence on all of us, but you do, for my money, one of the very best Loren Michaels' impressions, and you do one specific.
forum
/ˈfɔɹəm/
noun
a public meeting place where people can discuss and exchange views on various topics or issues
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Examples

1The forum is a collaboration between the Harvard Chan School and independent news media.
2The forum has a great open rectangular space.
3Join my singers forums, man.
4Trolling the forums.
5Still trolling them forums.
freethinking
/fɹˈiːθɪŋkɪŋ/
adjective
forming one’s own ideas rather than accepting what is generally accepted

Examples

to gag
/ˈɡæɡ/
verb
to limit freedom of speech or to prevent someone from writing or talking about a particular subject
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Examples

1And gagged.
2Excuse the gag.
3Sometimes patients gag.
4Absolutely gagging.
5I gag.
gag
/ˈɡæɡ/
noun
a limitation on freedom of speech or a restriction on dissemination of information
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Examples

1And gagged.
2Excuse the gag.
3Sometimes patients gag.
4Absolutely gagging.
5I gag.
to get above oneself
/ɡɛt əbˌʌv wʌnsˈɛlf/
phrase
to consider oneself better or more significant than one really is

Examples

to get on one's soapbox
/ɡɛt ˌɑːn wˈʌnz sˈoʊpbɑːks/
phrase
to share one’s strong opinions about something, often to others' annoyance

Examples

to give voice to sth
/ɡˈɪv vˈɔɪs/
verb
to allow one’s feelings or opinions to be expressed

Examples

to go by
/ɡˌoʊ bˈaɪ/
verb
to form an opinion or judgement based on the information or experience one already has
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Examples

1Two weeks Go By, we don't get a call.
good name
/ɡˈʊd nˈeɪm/
noun
the positive opinion that people have about a person or a thing based on their reputation
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Examples

1- It was a good name.
2Got lots of good names in today’s episode.
3It's a good name.
4It's a good name.
5That's a good name.
to go on
/ɡˌoʊ ˈɑːn/
verb
to base an opinion or a judgment on something
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Examples

1When the lights went on, the young man saw that his neighbor was the doctor who had examined him earlier.
2When he finally went on his sleepy way home, Tom felt sure that he had just made an excellent new friend.
3What is going on here?
4The long list could go on.
5And there's also a whole other category of treatment that's pretty different from the talking and listening that goes on in psychotherapy.
to have a down on
/hæv ɐ dˌaʊn ˈɑːn/
phrase
to dislike someone or have hostility towards them

Examples

to have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of
/hæv ɐ ɡˈʊd bˈæd hˈaɪ lˈoʊ ɛtsˈɛtɹə əpˈɪniən ʌv/
phrase
to view someone or something as bad, high, low, etc.

Examples

having said that
/hˌævɪŋ sˈɛd ðˈæt/
phrase
in spite of what has just been mentioned
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Examples

1Having said that, people in the UK are very friendly.
2Having said that, I outlined my talk about five minutes ago.
3But having said that, the legislative branch is more open.
4Having said that, these bugs are important.
5Having said that, most individuals initially present with recurrent oral ulcers.
hogwash
/ˈhɑˌɡwɑʃ/
noun
an absurd idea or discussion
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Examples

1Well, there are still some scientists who would say, hogwash.
2Given this, it could be said that the similarities between cat and internet are not just incidental hogwash.
3Simply put, this is hogwash.
4That's absolute hogwash.
5This is hogwash.
hokum
/ˈhoʊkəm/
noun
a stupid argument, discussion, etc.
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Examples

1So our man Merleau-Ponty said that this is a bunch of the hokum.
2Now, just to be perfectly clear, I am not saying that science is complete hokum.
3Or maybe this dichotomy is just a bunch of hokum and that we shouldn't view simulated Tesla as history at all, more like historical reproduction.
4On the other hand, a lot of people think it's all hokum, and in fact the predominant view in the twentieth century has been that there's no such thing as disinterestedness, that whatever we are looking at we have an interest in and form views of, and that this Kantian moment of dispassionate or disinterested contemplation is what the early twentieth-century critic I.A. Richards called a "phantom aesthetic state."
to hold
/ˈhoʊɫd/
verb
to have a specific opinion or belief about someone or something
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Examples

1- Hold the phones.
2Hold your skin taut, grasp tabs, bone, pull.
3- Hold my arms.
4Your opponent holds the remote.
5Hold the phone.
to hold against
/hˈoʊld ɐɡˈɛnst/
verb
to have a lower opinion of someone because of their actions in the past
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Examples

1But it is pretty resilient in holding against temperature.
2Well, it's just another thing to hold against you Bryan.
3I'm being held against my will.
4I don't think I can hold against a moose kick.
5You're being held against your will.
to hold one's peace
/hˈoʊld wˈʌnz pˈiːs/
phrase
to resist the temptation to say something; to stay calm

Examples

how's that?
/hˌaʊz ðˈæt/
phrase
used to inquire about someone's opinion of something

Examples

hue
/ˈhju/
noun
a type of attitude, belief, or opinion one has
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Examples

1Most colored diamonds owe their hue to some kind of chemical impurity in their carbon lattice.
2A sprinkling of white furnishings balances bolder hues.
3When Emilia Clarke isn't wearing her platinum wig as the Mother of Dragons on Game of Thrones, for example, her go-to hue is warm brown.
4As for the color, the white hue reflects the heat of the sun better than other colors.
5Warm hues are reds, oranges, and yellows.
to have second thoughts
/hæv sˈɛkənd θˈɔːts/
phrase
to start doubting a decision and begin to wonder whether it is the right or best thing to do
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Examples

1I never had second thoughts.
2But if you actually had to copy and paste that and put it under your own name, you might have second thoughts.
3You might remember, President Obama had pledged to accept at least 10,000 over the next year but after news broke that one of the attackers may have posed as a refugee and entered Europe through Greece with a fake Syrian passport, many U.S. officials had second thoughts.
4Even Kennedy might have had second thoughts while his relationship with King had slowly improved from contentious to careful to respectful over the eight years they'd known each other and causes came increasingly to overlap and two men had never been close.
5Always have second thoughts on stories about the jockstrap world of men only.
to hunker down
/hˈʌŋkɚ dˈaʊn/
verb
to hold on to one’s opinions or position, especially when confronted by unfavorable circumstances or criticism

Examples

at length
/æt lˈɛŋθ/
adverb
in great detail or extensively
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Examples

1And I spoke At Length about this report they put OUT.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!