to heart
/ˈhɑɹt/
verb
to be excessively infatuated with someone or something
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Examples

1I heart Sean forever.
2No man or monster has slithered their way into our hearts quite like the snake-haired seductress with the obsidian stare.
3Sparkle hearts, do sparkle hearts.
4Heart patches.
5Bailey loves hearts.
inclined
/ˌɪnˈkɫaɪnd/
adjective
having a tendency to do something; possessing an innate ability for something
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Examples

1That boy is musically inclined, Lord Jesus.
2if you feel so inclined.
3So both defense companies and Congress are inclined to strike a deal quickly.
4They were scientifically inclined.
5It is more culturally inclined.
keen
/ˈkin/
adjective
having a strong affection for someone or something
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Examples

1My mace is keen.
2- keen chef, you just put in apricot preserve, sugar, lemon juice, and a little bit of apricot brandy.
3The sense of smell in a wolverine is very, very, very keen.
4"Ba'ax kéen a beetej?"
5Go, Keen!
to lean toward
/lˈiːn tʊwˈɔːɹd/
verb
to favor something, especially an opinion
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Examples

1Number 2: lean toward the person that you're speaking with.
2I would definitely lean toward Levi for this battle.
3He leans toward the Mennonite.
4Now I was leaning toward Yale anyway
5- I'm leaning toward no.
to like
/ˈɫaɪk/
verb
to feel that someone or something is good, enjoyable, or interesting
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Examples

1The ads will certainly emphasize things like good taste, easy preparation, and high nutrition.
2"I'd like some more jam, please."
3Everybody likes his daughter.
4I like chicken.
5Grains are plants, like oats, wheat, and barley.
like
/ˈɫaɪk/
noun
a set of things one enjoys or has a tendency for
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Examples

1The ads will certainly emphasize things like good taste, easy preparation, and high nutrition.
2"I'd like some more jam, please."
3Everybody likes his daughter.
4I like chicken.
5Grains are plants, like oats, wheat, and barley.
to love
/ˈɫəv/
verb
to like or enjoy doing something a lot
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Examples

1Americans love cheese.
2It speaks to the power of love.
3I love that laugh.
4He loves hugging strangers.
5And I love John Smith as a character because he was a braggart.
mad
/ˈmæd/
adjective
very fond of someone or something
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Examples

1She certainly did not look desperate or mad enough to have tried to murder her master.
2If you were mad, I wouldn't hate you.
3I shall be alone with that mad woman upstairs.
4They're all mad!
5The whole country went mad.
misogynist
/ˈmɪzədʒɪnɪst/
noun
someone who hates or despises women or assumes men are much better
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Examples

1Misogynists struck back against these protests.
2Have you been called a misogynist, a racist, a pig and every other word in the world by journalists?
3So misogynists hated that.
4Ooh, it's misogynist and everything.
5A misogynist was sick, at death’s door.
misogynistic
/mɪsˌɑːdʒɪnˈɪstɪk/
adjective
detesting women or having a low opinion of them
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Examples

1I did a lot of misogynistic jokes, a lot of terrible rape gags.
2And there certainly were a smattering of misogynistic idiots.
3- I just made a misogynistic joke.
4- That's some misogynistic stuff, man. -
5- I beg your misogynistic pardon?
overfond
/ˌoʊvɚfˈɑːnd/
adjective
deeply obsessed with someone or something

Examples

partial
/ˈpɑɹʃəɫ/
adjective
liking someone or something, or having an interest in them
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Examples

1You kind of do partials.
2New York State just passed a partial raise the age law.
3And the agencies only have partial authority.
4What's partial derivative?
5Partial replacement replaces only one side of your knee joint.
partiality
/ˌpɑɹʃiˈæɫəti/
noun
a specific fondness for someone or something
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Examples

1History, right down to the present day, has always suffered from the partiality and mistakes of historians.
2Now Joseph's brothers are jealous of Jacob's partiality to Joseph, and they conspire to be rid of him.
3Observing my partiality for domestic pets, she lost no opportunity of procuring those of the most agreeable kind.
4With my aversion to this cat, however, its partiality for myself seemed to increase.
5So the next question is about partiality.
passion
/ˈpæʃən/
noun
an excessive aspiration or desire for someone or something
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Examples

1Passion is like talk.
2Competence beats passion.
3Passion beholds its object as a perfect unit.
4Passion gives power and meaning.
5Passion makes productivity effortless.
penchant
/ˈpɛntʃənt/
noun
a strong tendency to do something or a fondness for something
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Examples

1So I have a penchant for I words.
2But their penchant for violence and sacrifice soon disgusted their employers.
3Like her husband, she has a penchant for speed and daredevil activities, with eight motorcycles and a Porsche in her collection.
4Do you have a penchant for fast food and French fries?
5Avoid Lisbeth's penchant for disregarding privacy laws.
pet peeve
/pˈɛt pˈiːv/
noun
something that annoys or bothers someone on a personal levelsomething that annoys or bothers someone on a personal level
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Examples

1Name one pet peeve of mine.
2So, what are your style pet peeves?
3This owner has a pet peeve about bad automobile entries.
4But is that even a pet peeve?
5Is people with pet peeves.
picky
/ˈpɪki/
adjective
extremely careful with their choices and hard to please
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Examples

1But for a long time, these optical mark-sensing machines were very picky.
2And my first tip is be picky.
3And the sausage dog is picky.
4These canines aren't picky.
5Mosquitoes are surprisingly picky too.
to please
/ˈpɫiz/
verb
to do or behave as one desires
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Examples

1On the way, the driver said to Harry politely, 'Could you please tell me why we are doing all these things?
2"Please forgive me, I didn't know that you were her mother."
3"I'd like some more jam, please."
4Ellen, please ask a maid to find some dry clothes for me, and then I'll go on to the village.
5Gear-i, cancel this order, please.
potty
/ˈpɑti/
adjective
deeply fascinated by someone, particularly in a foolish or unreasonable way
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Examples

1Maybe go potty.
2Go potty again.
3Just go potty.
4Just go potty.
5Go potty.
to prefer
/pɹəˈfɝ/, /pɹiˈfɝ/, /pɹɪˈfɝ/
verb
to want or choose one person or thing instead of another because of liking them more
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Examples

1Ironically, they prefer meat to vegetables, the unhealthy diet.
22-3. Onion and garlic These vegetables prefer warmer temperatures.
3And long term investors prefer the bigger price target.
4Different families prefer different types of calls.
5Some employers prefer candidates with experience in the police force or military.
preferable
/ˈpɹɛfɝəbəɫ/, /ˈpɹɛfɹəbəɫ/
adjective
more desirable or favored compared to other options
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Examples

1That might be preferable.
2The greatest financial difficulties are preferable to public begging!
3- That's preferable.
4In these situations, an avoidance maneuver is always preferable to a confrontation.
5In another room is preferable.
preferably
/ˈpɹɛfɝəbɫi/, /ˈpɹɛfɹəbɫi/
adverb
in a way that shows a liking or a priority for something over others
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Examples

1Preferably stuffed.
2Most people will preferably have a marshmallow now than two in the next hour.
3Preferably, keep the consumption level up to 200 mg.
4Freeze this at least six hours, preferably overnight.
5Just a regular tea light, preferably is a soy candle or beeswax.
preference
/ˈpɹɛfɝəns/, /ˈpɹɛfɹəns/
noun
a strong liking or inclination towards something or someone over others
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Examples

1Many tortoises have color preferences.
2Chameleons actually have taste preferences.
3My preference is that you always back up the entire disk.
4One is preference.
5Because veterans get the preference.
prejudiced
/ˈpɹɛdʒədəst/
adjective
having a preconceived opinion, idea, or belief about someone or something, particularly in an unreasonable way
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Examples

1And he is not prejudiced, at all.
2I'm not prejudiced.
3You're like, "I'm not prejudiced."
4One of the show's most shocking moments saw chef Mila, the first female to helm the galley on the hit Bravo franchise, making prejudiced comments to other members of Captain Sandy's crew.
5I'm prejudiced.
to put off
/pˌʊt ˈɔf/
verb
to cause a person to dislike someone or something
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Examples

1At 6 o'clock, he put off the phone.
2It's putting off a dust.
3Alper Göknar's appointment was put off until a later date.
4Lush's prices will put off some customers.
5In the United Kingdom, women are putting off marriage.
repugnance
/ɹɪpˈʌɡnəns/
noun
an extreme aversion or hostility that one has to someone or something
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Examples

1Rarely, until the nineteenth century, did mention of The Prince elicit other than unfounded and largely unexamined repugnance, much less encourage objective scrutiny of its actual issues.
2He was often well-bred, and, out of politeness, expressed sympathy with France and repugnance at being compelled to take part in the war.
3He knew the repugnance to divorce existing in the French Catholic world, but since the French laws sanctioned it, and in a case so flagrant as his injured friend's, would inevitably accord it with the least possible delay and exposure, he could not take seriously any risk of opposition on the part of the husband's family.
4They talked about their feelings of repugnance for John Bolton, Mr Trump's national security adviser.
5Rousseau, you will remember, in the Second Discourse, the Discourse on Inequality, made pitié or compassion, a repugnance to view the suffering of others, as a fundamental feature of natural man.
repulsion
/ɹɪpˈʌlʃən/
noun
intense hatred or disgust
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Examples

1If the rotors spin fast enough, this repulsion leads to levitation.
2That'll turn repulsion into an attraction.
3At each point the repulsion has to be away from the center.
4So that's weak net repulsion.
5Could the electron-pair repulsion explain the difference in bond disassociation energies between the top and bottom?
resistance
/ɹiˈzɪstəns/, /ɹɪˈzɪstəns/
noun
the act of refusing to accept or obey something such as a plan, law, or change
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Examples

1Well, pressure implies resistance.
2Resistance is everywhere.
3- Low vibration equals resistance.
4Their images fuelled resistance to the war and to racism.
5Facing resistance?
to take a fancy to sb/sth
/tˈeɪk ɐ fˈænsi tʊ ˌɛsbˈiː slˈæʃ ˌɛstˌiːˈeɪtʃ/
phrase
to grow to like someone or something, often without any specific reason
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Examples

1I think you’d take a fancy to cats if you could only see her.
2I think you’d take a fancy to cats if you could only see her.
3If six of those take a fancy to you in the water, you're fresh out of luck.
4These were found in the skies all over the world, with some being larger than fighter jets, and could easily scoop you up at any moment if they took a fancy to you.
to take against
/tˈeɪk ɐɡˈɛnst/
verb
to start to dislike someone or something

Examples

to take a shine to sb/sth
/tˈeɪk ɐ ʃˈaɪn tʊ ˌɛsbˈiː slˈæʃ ˌɛstˌiːˈeɪtʃ/
phrase
to start to feel attached to or fascinated by someone or something
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Examples

1The off-broadway director took a shine to Galen’s new lover, and he and Milk soon became friends.
2Cassidy took a shine to young Bob, who appeared to idolize the swaggering outlaw.
3Fan theories quickly circulated that Lennix was secretly Martian Manhunter in disguise, and Snyder took a shine to the idea, planning a big reveal during the events of his Justice League movie.
4It features intricacies like an organ player, and nearly 4000 windows at seven foot tall, even Amy's cat took a shine to this architectural LEGO Marvel.
to take to
/tˈeɪk tuː/
verb
to start to like someone or something

Examples

to warm to
/wˈɔːɹm tuː/
verb
to start to like someone or something
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Examples

1Keeping warming to three degrees is better than four degrees.
2Keeping warming to two and a half degrees is better than three degrees.
3Our vulnerability is something they warm to, rather than they are appalled by.
4But if you warm to 21 degrees, now you see the absorption from the monomer.
5But if you warm to 21 degrees, now you see the absorption from the monomer.
would
/ˈwʊd/
verb
used to express a tendency or desire
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Examples

1Having farms in the city would solve these problems.
2"I'd like some more jam, please."
3She would use hand gestures too.
4Would the explosion knock its orbit towards earth, causing tidal waves and misery?
5His eleventh child, Rory, would be born six months later.
would rather
/wʊd ɹˈæðɚ/
phrase
used to say one would prefer to have or do something
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Examples

1A nurse took Helen to her room and told Sam that he could go home and she would call him when the baby arrived, but Sam said he would rather wait at the hospital.
2But it was not easy for me I would rather have shown him my love.
3He could live here at Thrushcross Grange, which is a finer house than Wuthering Heights, but he would rather receive rent than live comfortably.
4I would rather be here at Wuthering Heights with her, even if I'm punished by Joseph and that wicked Hindley, than at Thrushcross Grange with those two fools!'
5I would rather this kid go to someone who clearly actually loves him, knows how to take care of disabled kids and isn't going to be ableist towards his kids, but it's just, why didn't you understand this before you put this kid through all this trauma?
would sooner
/wʊd sˈuːnɚ/
phrase
used to indicate one's preference to do, have, or achieve something (than something else)
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Examples

1Whatever apocalypse Huff Po fears is signaled not by teens dealing clumsily with tragedy but by a world that would sooner judge than converse with them, perhaps as a result of its own inability to confront death.
2However in nature, any species that is overhunting, overexploiting the resources they depend on as nourishment, natural selection would sooner or later take the predator out, because it offsets the balance.
3The man who says that he would sooner die is best answered by a sudden blow with the poker, for the reply is rightly logical, as well as physically very effective.
4They would sooner sacrifice the numbers to save the people.
5So you would sooner look after your friends before caring for those in greater need? -
to stir up
/stˈɜːɹ ˈʌp/
verb
to cause unpleasant or strong feelings
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Examples

1They stir up trouble.
2Stirring up our little town
3The Russian government stirs up pan-Slavic fervor in the Balkans.
4These toxins stir up trouble in your gastrointestinal tract.
5Few famous couples have stirred up as much drama as Brangelina .

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