to enjoin
/ˌɛnˈdʒɔɪn/, /ɪnˈdʒɔɪn/
verb
to tell someone to do something by ordering or instructing them
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Examples

1The district judge enjoined us.
2Benedict also enjoins manual labor.
3You're not enjoined in any way.
4And it enjoined construction of the permit for the right of way for the Alaska pipeline.
5The district court enjoined them again.
feedback
/ˈfidˌbæk/
noun
information, criticism, or advice about a person's performance, a new product, etc. intended for improvement
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Examples

1You guys also have rejected feedback.
2Avoid feedback.
3Next, get feedback.
4University ombuds provide feedback on trends and on potential problem areas to the university leadership.
5Get feedback.
to follow
/ˈfɑɫoʊ/
verb
to act accordingly to someone or something's advice, commands, or instructions
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Examples

1I follow a group of firefighters with one of Brazil’s environmental agencies into a biological reserve.
2Will you follow dogma, or will you be original?
3This news follows a mess of suggestive rumors and leaks.
4The cows follow the cow.
5The horse follows the horse.
guidance
/ˈɡaɪdəns/
noun
help and advice about how to solve a problem, given by someone who is knowledgeable and experienced
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Examples

1Guidance is internal.
2[AIR HISSING] Ground control: T-minus 15 seconds, guidance is internal.
3Your mind needs guidance.
4Your mind needs guidance.
5That powerful computer of your mind needs guidance.
to guide
/ˈɡaɪd/
verb
to direct or influence someone's motivation or behavior
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Examples

1The storytelling guided the data out there.
2At the same time, the leader guides a talk about bullying.
3Two frontiers will guide this transformation.
4Computer guided milling machine cuts to parts.
5In the jungle, the moon guides the way for some old friends of ours.
guiding
/ˈɡaɪdɪŋ/
adjective
assisting and giving advice; having a strong impact on others
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Examples

1So even just giving more transparency to that information, some guiding, some coaching.
2A Brigadier General needs an eye for detail and a strong guiding hand.
3Singer and Dickey resume their guiding.
4The camera motor can pull out of the plastic guiding shaft.
5The home button will be your main guiding point with that bottom side of the screen.
to hand out
/hˈænd ˈaʊt/
verb
to give a penalty or a piece of advice
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Examples

1- Hand out those barrels.
2This game hands out lessons.
3The North Korean military also hands out brutal punishments to its soldiers.
4The young women hand out honey cakes, tea, coffee, rice and palm wine.
5The young women hand out honey cakes, tea, coffee, rice and palm wine.
have to
/hˈæv tuː/
verb
used to indicate an obligation or to emphasize the necessity of something happening
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Examples

1A very strict officer was talking to some new soldiers whom he had to train.
2You don't really have to fuss with it.
3This adaptation has to do with a specialized enzyme: lactase.
4And the court then has to make a determination.
5He had an assignment he had to memorize.
heads-up
/ˈhɛdˌzəp/
noun
an advance warning intended to draw someone's attention or indicate the occurrence of something
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Examples

1A Heads-up play from Jeter, and a heads-down play from Giambi may have just given this game to the Yankees.
2Any of the lawsuits like did you have a HEADS-UP?
to heed
/ˈhid/
verb
to be attentive to advice or a warning
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Examples

1And other plants heed this warning.
2Narcissists take heed.
3Please heed those warnings.
4Give heed to it.
5In addition, 300 knights had heeded the call to the city’s defence, as well as contingents from the nearby castles of Rosby and Stokeworth.
help
/ˈhɛɫp/
noun
something that is given to someone as an aid or resource in order to solve their problems
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Examples

1Some bacteria help humans in many ways.
2The penicillin helped the patient's body destroy harmful bacteria.
3Money from a city job helped them buy these things.
4Dad is going to need help when he leaves hospital.
5Children must help their parents.
helpline
/hˈɛlplaɪn/
noun
a phone service that provides advice, comfort, or information regarding specific problems
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Examples

1After that call the helpline and explain the situation.
2Well, we've set up a special helpline just for your audience.
3The chapel houses a telephone helpline.
4- Hi, I'm David Murphy, Lifehacker’s Senior Tech Editor, and your personal computer helpline in Tech 911.
5Call the poison control helpline if your pet has eaten any part of this plant.
homily
/ˈhɑməɫi/
noun
a speech or a piece of writing that is meant to advise people on the correct way of behaving
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Examples

1As homily blurred into homily, Binham's flock continued to gaze.
2As homily blurred into homily, Binham's flock continued to gaze.
3That's homily.
4I quoted to you at length from the Tudor Homily on Obedience first published in 1547 with its stress on hierarchy, degree, order, subordination, and obedience.
5In 1537, Cromwell and Cranmer engineered the issue of the Bishop's Book, a set of homilies which again moved cautiously towards Protestant definitions of faith.
how-to
/hˈaʊɾuː/
adjective
giving thorough instructions on a particular matter
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Examples

1Disclaimer, this is not a how-to.
2There's so much how-to on the internet.
3The how-to is usually not that complex.
4- Hi, I'm Darlene from GoDaddy's How-to.
5Oh, I'm just watching these how-to basic videos on YouTube.
if in doubt
/ɪf ɪn dˈaʊt/
phrase
‌used to offer advice or instructions to someone who is incapable of making decisions
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Examples

1If in doubt, portion mark everything.
2If in doubt, portion mark everything.
3You might not want to use relaxed pronunciation and in fact, if in doubt, don't do it because it can be seen as informal.
4If in doubt, always consult your doctor before taking a thermogenic drink.
5So if in doubt and I really need to have enforcement, then I can make a claim against others who have never been part of the game.
in one's place
/ɪn sˈʌmwʌnz plˈeɪs/
phrase
‌used to offer advice on someone else's problem based on similar experience that one has
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Examples

1And the fact that the uncle is saying, "I would've done the same thing if I was in their place."
2It is then that Winston breaks down and wishes that Julia receive this punishment in his place.
3Astronomy is really, really good at putting us in our place.
4It’s still science, of course, but astronomy puts you in your place.
5Astronomy puts you in your place.
if I were you
/ɪf aɪ wɜː jˈuː/
phrase
used to tell someone what is better for them to do
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Examples

1'If I were you, I'd hate her,' I cried.
2I would be selling Russian stocks if I were you.
3It's a case that probably most of you haven't heard about, but I'd look it up if I were you.
4If I were you, I'd become a hobo and wander Tuscany.
5If I were you, I would buy the bag.
to indicate
/ˈɪndəˌkeɪt/
verb
(medical) to advise and authorize a treatment or procedure due to a particular condition or circumstance
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Examples

1The acute medical therapy is indicated in the exposure.
2Absence of P waves indicates non-sinus rhythms.
3P-wave inversion in the inferior leads indicates a non-sinus rhythm.
4In accordance with Randy's theory, the polygraph test indicated no signs of deception.
5A dry nose can indicate fever or dehydration.
inadvisable
/ˌɪnædˈvaɪzəbəɫ/, /ˌɪnədˈvaɪzəbəɫ/
adjective
not sensible and likely to have unwanted consequences
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Examples

1MICHAEL MOYNIHAN: We were quietly told earlier in the day that it would be inadvisable to show up at certain bonfires uninvited with a camera crew in tow.
2- I don't wanna call Josh an idiot explicitly, but I would say that it was inadvisable to flip the anti griddle in the way that he did.
3"There is an old saying that is inadvisable to put all your eggs in one basket."
4For example, it is inadvisable for you to use all your income to pay off your debt, even if doing so will leave you debt-free.
5It even encouraged me to pursue some more fulfilling career paths that may otherwise have been inadvisable.
marriage counseling
/mˈæɹɪdʒ kˈaʊnsəlɪŋ/
noun
a type of psychotherapy for married couples that helps them understand and resolve conflicts in order to improve their relationship
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Examples

1And in his decades of marriage counseling, he found that people receive or understand or interpret love in very specific ways that can be grouped into some major categories.
2This is what we call marriage counseling.
3The next couple of months, I immediately started marriage counseling, and my number one goal and desire is for reconciliation in my marriage.
4Listen, they need to go to divorce court, not marriage counseling.
5The statement also revealed they attempted marriage counseling, but had ultimately decided to call it quits.
marriage guidance
/mˈæɹɪdʒ ɡˈaɪdəns/
noun
a piece of advice offered by a trained professional aiming to resolve conflicts among married couple

Examples

mentee
/mˈɛntiː/
noun
someone who is advised or trained under the supervision of a mentor
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Examples

1I mean, what does a mentee do?
2Belichick's mentee had been proclaimed the Mangenius.
3One of my mentees 500 billion with a B NEOM, the city of the future of the 22nd century Klaus Kleinfeld who came to me even before Dan in 1997.
4A mentee of mine, Gary Wong, he is a realtor in Vancouver.
5I take my students, my mentees through a seven week program where I literally give them this high impact, high emotional experience.
mentor
/ˈmɛnˌtɔɹ/, /ˈmɛntɝ/
noun
a reliable and experienced person who helps those with less experience
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Examples

1So mentors often give advice.
2Mentoring young generation, bright generations.
3We need mentors.
4Mentors have to choose.
5Mentors feel a great sense of productivity.
mentoring
/ˈmɛntɝɪŋ/
noun
the practice of offering advice or helping a younger or less experienced individual over a period of time regarding their job or a particular subject
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Examples

1Because traditional mentoring is a very passive thing.
2So I started a little mentoring, a little coaching business.
3- So woman-to-woman mentoring is the most powerful tool.
4Mentoring is useful for a number of reasons.
5Books can provide wonderful mentoring.
mentorship
/ˈmɛntɝˌʃɪp/
noun
the guidance, help, or advice given by a mentor, particularly in a company or educational institution
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Examples

1Habit number eight, successful people seek mentorship.
2So successful people seek mentorship.
3Have you seeked mentorship?
4And mentorship obviously plays a big role.
5I put mentorship up there with parents, up there with coach.

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