accountable
/əˈkaʊnəbəɫ/, /əˈkaʊntəbəɫ/
adjective
responsible for one's actions and being ready to explain them
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Examples

1No one is accountable.
2Be accountable.
3I am accountable.
4Tobacco smoking is accountable for about 90% of COPD cases.
5Is it accountable?
arbitrary
/ˈɑɹbəˌtɹɛɹi/, /ˈɑɹbɪˌtɹɛɹi/
adjective
not based on reason but on chance or personal impulse, which is often unfair
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Examples

1-Those dates are arbitrary.
2That target is arbitrary.
3That date is arbitrary.
4Components of vectors are arbitrary.
5Those assumptions are typically arbitrary.
decisive
/dɪˈsaɪsɪv/
adjective
able to make decisions quickly and confidently
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Examples

1Every kill feels incredibly decisive.
2Be decisive.
3The next week was decisive.
4And that verdict is absolutely decisive.
5- Stay decisive.
eligible
/ˈɛɫədʒəbəɫ/, /ˈɛɫɪdʒəbəɫ/
adjective
possessing the right to do or have something because of having the required qualifications
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Examples

1Podcasters are eligible.
2Eligible households will receive $25,000 each.
3The migrants are not eligible for federal payments.
4The majority of retirement plans from former employers are eligible for a rollover IRA.
5Is the adult male population eligible for the HPV vaccine?
inclined
/ˌɪnˈkɫaɪnd/
adjective
having a tendency to do something; possessing an innate ability for something
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Examples

1That boy is musically inclined, Lord Jesus.
2if you feel so inclined.
3So both defense companies and Congress are inclined to strike a deal quickly.
4They were scientifically inclined.
5It is more culturally inclined.
indecisive
/ˌɪndɪˈsaɪsɪv/
adjective
(of a person) having difficulty making choices or decisions, often due to fear, lack of confidence, or overthinking
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Examples

1But he's just indecisive.
2- Are you indecisive?
3You're not indecisive.
4Obviously he's indecisive.
5You can be super indecisive.
inflexible
/ˌɪnˈfɫɛksəbəɫ/
adjective
reluctant to compromise or change one's attitude, belief, plan, etc.
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Examples

1Very much giving you inflexible.
2So, I've always been kind of inflexible.
3This person is extremely inflexible in his thinking.
4Yo' girl is incredibly stiff, inflexible.
5Without treatment, the behavior and experience is inflexible and usually long-lasting.
preferable
/ˈpɹɛfɝəbəɫ/, /ˈpɹɛfɹəbəɫ/
adjective
more desirable or favored compared to other options
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Examples

1That might be preferable.
2The greatest financial difficulties are preferable to public begging!
3- That's preferable.
4In these situations, an avoidance maneuver is always preferable to a confrontation.
5In another room is preferable.
undecided
/ˌəndɪˈsaɪdɪd/
adjective
not yet made a decision or come to a judgment
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Examples

1The timing of President Trump's Senate impeachment trial remains undecided.
2Welcome to Undecided.
3Welcome to Undecided.
4Welcome to Undecided.
5Welcome to Undecided.
to despise
/dɪˈspaɪz/
verb
to hate and have no respect for something or someone
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Examples

1And lastly, I despise cold weather.
2Others despise it.
3I despise raw onions.
4I despise plants and minerals.
5- I, I absolutely despised dancing.
to find
/ˈfaɪnd/
verb
(of a law court) to make an official decision
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Examples

1After a while, companies wanted to find a way to include more information in the bar code.
2Then he drove into London, but he didn't find his hotel.
3Ellen, please ask a maid to find some dry clothes for me, and then I'll go on to the village.
4An improvised explosive device has been found at the Capitol.
5His suggestions never made any impact, until King Leopold II found Stanley’s work.
to overturn
/ˈoʊvɝˌtɝn/
verb
to reverse, abolish, or invalidate something, especially a legal decision
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Examples

1Most importantly, the commission officially overturned the result.
2What order did the protests overturn?
3On Wednesday, an Italian court overturned a government ban.
4Overturning Biden's election.
5The council immediately overturned the ban on pinball.
to please
/ˈpɫiz/
verb
to do or behave as one desires
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Examples

1On the way, the driver said to Harry politely, 'Could you please tell me why we are doing all these things?
2"Please forgive me, I didn't know that you were her mother."
3"I'd like some more jam, please."
4Ellen, please ask a maid to find some dry clothes for me, and then I'll go on to the village.
5Gear-i, cancel this order, please.
to put off
/pˌʊt ˈɔf/
verb
to cause a person to dislike someone or something
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Examples

1At 6 o'clock, he put off the phone.
2It's putting off a dust.
3Alper Göknar's appointment was put off until a later date.
4Lush's prices will put off some customers.
5In the United Kingdom, women are putting off marriage.
to reverse
/ɹiˈvɝs/, /ɹɪˈvɝs/
verb
to change something such as a process, situation, etc. to be the opposite of what it was before
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Examples

1But the Chinese interference reversed the fortunes completely.
2Reverse psychology?
3I put reverse thrust
4Reverse stall parking.
5Rolls reversed.
to rule
/ˈɹuɫ/
verb
to make an official decision about something
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Examples

1So does a site like this have rules?
2DIY beauty regimes are ruling the beauty world right now.
3Dogs need rules.
4-Because women rule the house.
5Daddy ruled.
to take a chance
/tˈeɪk ɐ tʃˈæns/
phrase
to undertake an action even though one might fail
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Examples

1I stopped you in this street and asked you to lend me some money, and you lent me five pounds, because you said that you were willing to take a chance so as to give a man a start on the road to success.'
2'Well,' answered the stranger, 'are you still willing to take a chance?'
3And so the way that they did the Kaepernick, kind of as a spokesperson and really taking chances.
4This diverse group of people that are basically taking a chance on a topic that they don't know is how big it's really growing.
5That seems like quite a lot, but the question remains as to how many Wrangler buyers are likely to drop a trusted brand they are devoted to and take a chance on something new.
to think twice
/θˈɪŋk twˈaɪs/
phrase
to think about something very carefully before doing it

Examples

to uphold
/əpˈhoʊɫd/
verb
(particularly of a law court) to state that a previous decision is correct
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Examples

1Yet other scientists uphold the original findings.
2United Nations judges in The Hague upheld a genocide conviction against former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic.
3The law upholds justice.
4Lower federal courts have also upheld the IEEPA against First Amendment free speech and Fifth Amendment due process challenges.
5Uphold the law.
admiration
/ˌædmɝˈeɪʃən/
noun
a feeling of much respect for and approval of someone or something
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Examples

1Number four, requires excessive admiration.
2Admiration is everything.
3Express your admiration.
4Express your admiration.
5I need admiration.
adoption
/əˈdɑpʃən/
noun
the action of starting to use a certain plan, name, method, or idea
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Examples

1Adoption can happen for many reasons.
2Whatever the situation, adoption is a part of many people’s lives.
3Adoption can be difficult for children.
4Today's word is adoption.
5And adoption was slow.
award
/əˈwɔɹd/
noun
an official decision based on which something is given to someone
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Examples

1Dundee cards award a perk or disadvantage for the end game.
2All right, sadly no points are awarded that round.
3The presser is awarded flair.
4But no points awarded that round.
5Awards mean the world to everyone.
consultation
/ˌkɑnsəɫˈteɪʃən/
noun
the act or process of discussing something with a person or a group of people
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Examples

1The consultation went on all day.
2We do individual research consultations.
3Rehab counselors also provide consultation for legal issues around the impact of injuries on work activities.
4You probably have a consultation.
5They also required less consultation.
conundrum
/kəˈnəndɹəm/
noun
a problem or question that is confusing and needs a lot of skill or effort to solve or answer
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Examples

1Muller's ratchet poses a conundrum for our understanding of amoebas.
2Shaq, this conundrum is for you.
3Now we have a conundrum.
4This is conundrum.
5And there en lies the conundrum.
dilemma
/dɪˈɫɛmə/
noun
a situation that is difficult because a choice must be made between two or more options that are equally important
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Examples

1The dilemma is having only two options.
2The classic example is the prisoner's dilemma.
3Lick daddy has a dilemma.
4Consider their dilemma.
5Advico Y&R agency in Switzerland faced a dilemma.
jurisdiction
/ˌdʒʊɹəsˈdɪkʃən/, /ˌdʒʊɹɪsˈdɪkʃən/
noun
the power or authority of a court of law or an organization to make legal decisions and judgements
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Examples

1Together we have jurisdiction.
2What is jurisdiction?
3The court has original jurisdiction over lawsuits between two or more states.
4Who has jurisdiction?
5No government agency has jurisdiction over the truth.
prejudice
/ˈpɹɛdʒədɪs/
noun
an unreasonable opinion or judgment based on dislike felt for a person, group, etc., particularly because of their race, sex, etc.
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Examples

1We curse prejudice.
2So the individual scientists may be prejudiced.
3And therefore prejudice as dogma is declining.
4It obviously prejudices the jury.
5It prejudices the judge.
resistance
/ɹiˈzɪstəns/, /ɹɪˈzɪstəns/
noun
the act of refusing to accept or obey something such as a plan, law, or change
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Examples

1Well, pressure implies resistance.
2Resistance is everywhere.
3- Low vibration equals resistance.
4Their images fuelled resistance to the war and to racism.
5Facing resistance?
ruling
/ˈɹuɫɪŋ/
noun
a decision made by someone with official power, particularly a judge
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Examples

1And Judge Amy Berman Jackson's ruling does have some pretty strong language about the Justice Department.
2The U.S. Justice Department immediately appealed the ruling.
3Their ruling is almost irrelevant here.
4The judges based their ruling on a principle of French law.
5- Hold on, official ruling.
verdict
/ˈvɝdɪkt/
noun
an opinion given or a decision made after much consideration
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Examples

1Verdict, what do you think?
2- All right folks, the verdict is in.
3Magistrate judges can accept felony jury verdicts.
4- Has the jury reached a verdict?
5Here's Dan Stapleton's verdict.
to have a think
/hæv ɐ θˈɪŋk/
phrase
to think about something before making a decision
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Examples

1You have a think.
2If you have a Pixel 2 a lot of these features will come to you via software update, and if you have an iPhone well take a long look at your blue bubbles and your iCloud photo groups and have a think about how important they are to you.
3So have a think.
4Just have a think.
5So have a think if you got anything to ask Kelly.
to take sth into consideration
/tˈeɪk ˌɛstˌiːˈeɪtʃ ˌɪntʊ kənsˌɪdɚɹˈeɪʃən/
phrase
to give thought to a certain fact before making a decision
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Examples

1If you have anything else you'd like me to react to, I'll take it into consideration.
2So taking this data into consideration, President elect Biden, among others, expect our recovery to look something like the letter K where the richest Americans rebound quickly, perhaps do even better than they did pre covid and lower income Americans keep on suffering.
3We have to make sure we take the sign into consideration.
4But just to understand kind of a simplified scenario, let's take liquidation into consideration.
5I will sincerely take it into consideration.
to partake
/pɑɹˈteɪk/
verb
to participate in an event or activity
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Examples

1Things can partake of them.
2Please, partake safely!
3- We partake.
4- We partake.
5- They partake.
to undertake
/ˈəndɝˌteɪk/
verb
to take responsibility for something and start to do it
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Examples

1These young militants undertake a war on bourgeois specialists.
2And so the administration undertook an extensive review.
3And so the administration undertook a review.
4They undertook a long trip, a dangerous trip, a difficult trip from Antarctica to Thailand.
5They undertook a trip from Antarctica to Thailand.
thing
/ˈθɪŋ/
noun
something that someone is particularly interested in or drawn to
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Examples

1The ads will certainly emphasize things like good taste, easy preparation, and high nutrition.
2Now things are not so simple.
3The government effectively runs the whole thing.
4In the larger scheme of things, those things don't change your narrative.
5In the larger scheme of things, those things don't change your narrative.

Great!

You've reviewed all the words in this lesson!