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Society, Law, & Politics - Injustice

Explore English proverbs that depict injustice, including "some are more equal than others" and "justice delayed is justice denied".

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Society, Law, & Politics
desert and reward seldom keep company
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used to emphasize the idea that life is not always fair, and that people may not always receive the recognition or reward that they deserve
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the gods send nuts to those who have no teeth
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used to emphasize the unevenness or randomness of fortune, where valuable opportunities or possessions may be bestowed upon those who are unable to fully enjoy or utilize them
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laws catch flies, but let hornets go free
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used to suggest that laws are often more effective at punishing small offenses and less influential individuals, while powerful or influential individuals may escape punishment
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one law for the rich and another (law) for the poor
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used to suggest that the legal system is often biased in favor of the wealthy and influential, allowing them to receive special treatment or avoid punishment
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some are more equal than others
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used to imply that in certain situations, equality is not applied consistently or fairly, and that certain individuals or groups may receive better treatment or privileges than others
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when elephants fight, the grass gets trampled
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used to imply that conflicts between powerful entities can have serious consequences for those who are caught in the middle or who are weaker and more vulnerable
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the wholesomest meat is at another man's cost
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used to imply that the best things in life are often obtained at the expense of others
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justice delayed is justice denied
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used to stress the importance of timely delivery of justice, as any delay can render it ineffective and meaningless
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little thieves are hanged, but great ones escape
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used to imply that those who commit minor offenses are punished harshly, while those who commit more serious crimes or who have more power and influence often escape punishment
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