Verbs in English Grammar

Verbs in English Grammar

'Verb' originally meant 'word' in archaic languages. In the world of grammar, verbs are the second most populated country after nouns. Start your journey!

35 articles

Verbs

Verbs are one of the most necessary elements to make a sentence. In fact, without a verb, we cannot have a meaningful sentence.

Moods

Moods and tenses are different concepts in English grammar that are widely confused. In this lesson, we will learn all about moods in English grammar.

Voices

What are voices? How many voices are there in the English Grammar? Here are the most frequently asked questions by learners. Let us find the answers, here.

Active Voice

When the doer of the action is mentioned you are using the active voice. Let us learn more.

Passive Voice

Understanding the passive voice is important. The passive voice is used often by native English speakers. It's used both in formal and informal situations.

Phrasal Verbs

Phrasal verbs are used very commonly in English, even more so in informal situations. Phrasal verbs consist of a verb and a preposition or a particle.

Verb Phrases

It's time to learn how to identify the verb phrase in a sentence. Learning about verb phrases is essential in speaking and writing without mistakes.

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

'She smiled beautifully'. 'She started a rumor'. One of these sentences has an intransitive verb and one has a transitive one. Want to know the difference?

Ditransitive Verbs

Ditransitive verbs are transitive verbs that take two objects. A direct object and an indirect object. Follow the article to read more about them.

Ergative Verbs

Ergative verbs are a type of verbs that can be both transitive and intransitive. In this lesson, we will learn more about this type of verbs.

Regular and Irregular Verbs

Based on how we conjugate verbs in the past simple and the past participle, they can be divided into two types: Regular verbs and Irregular verbs.

Action vs. State Verbs

'I'm loving it!' or 'I love it!' Do you want to know which one of these famous advertisement mottos are correct? You got to learn about state and action verbs!

Auxiliary Verbs

Auxiliary verbs help the main verb to express tense or voice or help make questions and negative sentences. That's why they're also called 'helping verbs'.

Linking Verbs

Linking verbs are connectors of the language. Their only job is to link a subject with a subject complement. Want to know how?

Dummy Verbs

Have you ever repeated a word too much that made you think How boring it got! You can use dummy verbs instead of repeated verbs.

Catenative Verbs

Catenative verbs, also known as chain verbs, are followed by other verbs to form a chain of two or more verbs. In this lesson, we will discuss them in detail.

Participles

A participle is a word that is formed from a verb and is used to make compound verb forms. We have 2 kinds of participles: past and present participle.

Past Participles

The past participle is the third principal part of a verb that is most commonly known to be used with tenses. In this lesson, we will learn all about them.

Present Participles

Present participles are one of the key features of English language. It is a form of verb that ends in '-ing.' In this lesson, we will learn more about them.

Reflexive Verbs

Reflexive verbs are verbs that are used transitively to reflect back to the subject. Let us learn more. Follow the article.

Finite and Non-finite Verbs

Some verbs change their forms based on the person and tenses. In this lesson, you will learn more about these verbs.

Declarative Mood

There are different types of moods in English. Each shows a special manner toward the subject. In this article, we will focus on the declarative mood.

Imperative Mood

If you're wondering what the word 'imperative' means, in grammar, imperatives are verbs that are used to tell somebody what to do or not to do.

Subjunctive Mood

Subjunctive is a form or mood of verbs that helps us talk about wishes, possibility or uncertainty. To learn about this mood, start reading this article.

Interrogative Mood

Interrogative mood is a form of verb that is used to ask questions. Now if you want to learn how to make questions correctly, read this article.

Exclamatory Mood

There are six moods in English grammar. In this article, we will focus on the exclamatory mood. Exclamatives are moods of feelings.

Conditional Mood

Have you ever thought about something that might have happened if there was a different situation in the past? Conditionals help us talk about possibilities.

Zero Conditional

'If you don't eat or drink, you die'. 'If you heat water, it boils'. Zero conditional is used to talk about facts or situations which are always true.

Conditional I

We use the conditional Type 1 when we want to talk about situations we believe are real or possible in the future. 'If I study hard, I'll pass the exam.'

Conditional II

Type 2 conditional sentences talk about situations that are hypothetical. There is a possibility that the condition will be fulfilled.

Conditional III

Conditional III indicates an impossible, hypothetical and unreal condition in the past and its probable result in the past. To learn about them, start reading!

Mixed Conditional

Sometimes the two parts of a conditional sentence refer to different times. This is called a mixed conditional. Ready to learn?

Aspects

Verbs give information either about the subject or the state of the actions. As a result, aspects are formed. Let us learn more about them.

Causatives

'Causatives' indicate that someone did not do the action on their own, but they somehow intervened in the cause of the events.

Archaic Verb Conjugation

English has changed over time. Many words have changed their forms and pronunciations. In this lesson, we will cover the verbs that were changed.

What Are Verbs and Voices?

Almost every sentence requires a verb. In the English language, the basic form of the verb is called the infinitive.
Verbs have different tenses: 'present,' to indicate that an action is being carried out; past,' to indicate that an action has been done; 'future,' to indicate that an action will be done.
The 'voice' of a verb shows whether the subject of the verb is doing the action of the verb or whether the action is being done on the subject. The two most common voices are the active voice (as in "I saw the car") and the passive voice (as in "The car was seen by me").
Remember verbs can be conjugated depending on the subject or the tense.