As vs. Because

'As' and 'because' are conjunction of cause and effect. In this lesson, we will learn their similarities and differences.

"As" vs. "Because" in the English grammar

What Is Their Main Difference?

'As' and 'because' both introduce reasons in a sentence, but 'because' is more specific in meaning and typically used in formal contexts. 'As' has a broader range of meanings and can also indicate simultaneous actions.

Similarities and Differences

Both 'because' and 'as' are conjunctions used to introduce reasons or causes in sentences, explaining why something occurred. However, 'because' is primarily focused on the cause, However, 'as' has a broader range of meanings as a conjunction, including indicating reasons or simultaneous actions. 'Because' is often used formally, however, 'as' can be used in formal and informal contexts. Have a look:

He didn't go to work because he was sick.

Here, the use of "because" emphasizes that being sick was the direct cause or reason for not going to work.

As I had an early meeting, I went to bed early last night.

Here, 'as' introduces the reason for going to bed early, emphasizing the cause of the action.

She sang as she played the piano.

In this case, 'as' indicates that singing and playing the piano were happening at the same time.

Because it was getting late, we went home.

Parts of Speech

'As' can be used as a conjunction, preposition, or adverb.
'Because' can be used as a conjunction and preposition.
Take a look at the following examples:

She sings different songs as she showers.

Here, 'as' is a conjunction.

She works as a part-time tutor.

Here, 'as' is a preposition.

I called him because Charles advised me to do so.

Here, 'because' is a conjunction.

We returned home early because of the heavy rain.

Here, 'because' is followed by 'of' and is a preposition.

Tip!

We can use 'as' to express what happens simultaneously with another ongoing action just the same as while. We cannot use 'because' since it just expresses 'cause and reason'. Have a look:

He kept looking back as he ran through the crowd. Not He kept looking back because he ran through the crowd.

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