Go

As you may know, 'go' is a common verb in the English language. In this lesson, we are going to learn all there is about it.

How To Use "Go" in English?

'Go' is a commonly used verb in the English language. In this lesson, we are going to discuss how to learn and use it.

Functions of 'Go'

'Go' as the Main Verb

As you know, 'go' is commonly used as the main verb in the English language. Below, we are going to learn about the different meanings it can take when it is used in different contexts:

Use

  • When we want to show movement from one place to another, we use 'go':

Andrea wants to go to a restaurant.

I go to the office five days of the week.

  • When we want to show that we are headed to a particular destination with someone else, we use 'go':

The kids are going to the party with their parents.

Rick is going to the Netherlands with his dog.

  • When we want to indicate that someone is moving in a specific way, we use 'go':

They were going too fast and so the police gave them a ticket.

I want you to go as quick as you can.

  • When we want to show someone left a particular place, we use 'go':

I must get going now, sister.

Here, it indicates that that person must leave.

The guests arrived at 7 and went at around 1 a.m.

  • When we want to indicate that someone is travelling to another place, we can use 'go':

Sarah is going on a vacation this week.

Let's go on a trip together cause it will be really fun, don't you think?

  • We can use 'go' to indicate visiting a particular place or attending a class, meeting, etc:

We must all go to the hair salon this morning.

If they aren't at school, then where are they going?

He went to jail for half a year due to a minor theft.

The girls go to the university by bus everyday.

  • When we are checking websites on social media, we can use 'go on' to refer to it:

She went on Twitter and twitted some stuff about the recent news.

They went on to Facebook to check the new posts.

  • When we want to show that something is sent somewhere, we use 'go':

These packages must go to Apple Street.

I want this letter to go to Hogwarts immediately.

  • When something leads to a specific direction, we use 'go' to talk about it:

Where does this path go?

This road goes straight into the mountains.

  • When we want to point out the position of something, we can use 'go':

These books go to the lower shelf in the cabinet.

Where will this drum set go then?

  • When we want to start an activity, or tell some people to start it, we use 'go':

'One, two, three, go!'

  • When we want to indicate that we are removing something/someone or want to get rid of something, we use 'go':

I desperately want this bed to go.

If you become useless, you will have to go.

  • When something is not working or getting worse, we use 'go' to refer to it:

Unfortunately, her cancer is starting to go.

He told me that his mind is beginning to go.

  • When we want to politely talk about dying, we can use 'go':

Pa, you cannot take your money when you go.

  • When we want to sell something, we can use 'go':

My family won't let this car go for free.

  • When we want to talk about the time moving past, we can use 'go':

Don't you think that time has gone too fast?

Hours went past without us noticing it.

  • When we want to indicate that something/someone has disappeared, we use 'go':

Has your migraine gone away?

I left my phone on the table here and when I came back, it was gone.

  • We can also use 'go' to show that something does not fit into a particular place o thing:

Not all my clothes will go into this suitcase.

Well, you can try pushing your leg into the hole, but I don't think it goes.

  • When we want to talk about how something made progress, we use 'go':

With they way things are going, I don't think the company will last much long.

So, did everything go well between you two?

  • In mathematics, we can use 'go' to show that a number is contained in another an exact number of times. Look:

4 in 10 doesn't go.

10 into 100 goes ten times.

  • When we want to show that some things match or do not match, we use 'go':

This color does not go well with that one, you know.

I don't think these heels go with the dress you wanna wear.

  • When we want to point out how a poem, a song, or a story goes, we can use 'go':

I wonder how that story goes.

Unfortunately, I do not remember how this song goes.

  • We can use 'go' informally to mean 'saying something' when we are narrating a story:

He says 'are you pregnant?' and I go 'pregnant? me? why do you even say that?'

  • When we want to show that a machine, a system, etc. is working properly, we can use 'go':

Are all the engines going?

I want you to check and see if all the machines are going.

  • When we want to indicate that something plays a part in something else, we can use 'go':

All these examples go to further support my theory.

All your comments goes to prove that you have understood nothing.

  • We can use 'go' with many different nouns to talk about someone/something that has reached a particular condition. Look:

The countries went on war in 1896 and continued fighting till 1900.

Shhh! The baby has just gone to sleep.

This dress has gone out of fashion.

  • When we want to talk about money that is used for something, we use 'go':

Most of my salary goes on shopping.

This money will go to start the project.

Position in a Sentence

Since 'go' is the main verb here, it mainly comes after the subject. Please note that whenever we have an imperative sentence, we must put the verb at the beginning of the sentence. If we have an auxiliary verb, the main verb comes after it. Look at the following examples for more clarification:

I must go now.

As you can see, the main verb has come after the auxiliary verb.

Jessica goes to her aunties house once a week.

Go to your room and clean it.

'Go' as the Dummy Verb

As mentioned above, another function of 'go' is to be the dummy verb in some sentences. Below,we are going to learn all about it:

Use

As you might know, dummy verbs are used with particular nouns to have a specific meaning. If they are used alone, they are meaningless. Below is a list of the different meanings 'go' can take when it is used as a dummy verb:

  • When we have some nouns like 'shopping', 'swimming', etc. we use 'go' before them:

I like to go jogging in the afternoon.

They wanted to go shopping but changed their minds.

  • When we want to indicate that we are doing something while moving, we can use 'go':

A strong wind suddenly blew and all the letters went flying around the house.

Anna went shouting up the stairs.

Here, it is clear that the person is shouting while going up the stairs.

Position in a Sentence

As you know, dummy verbs are used with particular nouns to have a different meaning. So, when 'go' is functioning as a dummy verb, it must always come before a noun. Look at the following examples:

My sister and I go running every weekend.

As you can see, a noun has been used after the dummy verb.

Dad went cursing in the garden after he finished his phone call.

'Go' as a Linking Verb

We can also use 'go' as a linking verb. Below, we are going to learn all about it:

Use

As you might know, linking verbs are used to connect the subject to an adjective. 'Go' can sometimes function as a linking verb and connect the subject to an adjective. Look at the following examples:

  • We can use 'go' before some adjectives to talk about the condition of something/someone:

The only thing you can to is to go grey rock in front of her.

The children went missing for several days.

I hate it when my coffee goes cold.

  • When we want to indicate that something has been unreported, unnoticed, etc. we use 'go':

People fear that many homicides go unnoticed.

Why do I have the feeling that many crimes go unreported?

Position in a Sentence

As it was clear in the examples above, linking verbs connect the subject to an adjective. So, when 'go' is functioning as a linking verb, it must always come before an adjective. Look at the following examples for more clarification:

My coffee has gone cold so I want you to change it.

As you can see, 'go' has come before an adjective.

I know it sounds crazy but she went blind at the age of 20.

Tip!

It might come in handy to know that in spoken English, we can use 'go' with 'and' to show the purpose of an action or to tell someone to do something. Sometimes, this 'and' can be implied. Look below:

Go and get me a bottle of water, Maria!

Go get some salad then.

Here, 'and' is implied.

Idioms and Expressions

We have many different idioms and expressions with 'go'. Below, we are going to analyze them all:

  • Anything goes: This one is used when we want to indicate that nearly anything that someone says or does is accepted:

In these days that anything goes, hearing such a thing does not really surprise me.

  • As things/people go: This one is used when we want to compare some things/people with each other:

As concerts go, this one was not that bad.

As schools go, this one has the top ranking.

  • Don't go doing something: This one is used as a warning to tell someone not do something:

Please just don't go running back to that toxic ex of yours.

I warned Anne to not go getting herself into trouble.

  • Enough to be going on with: We use this one to indicate that something is enough just for a short period of time:

For your trip, this suitcase is enough to be going with.

  • Go all out for something: When we are trying our best to get something/ or do something, we use this expression to talk about it:

He went all out for reaching his goals.

  • Go and do something: When we want to show that someone feels annoyed or angry because of someone else's action, we use this idiom:

Did you really have to go and hurt her like that?

I'm sick of the fact that my sister went and angered mom like that for no particular reason.

  • Go off on one: This one is used to show someone is very angry:

It is not okay to go off on one too much.

He suddenly went off on me which I didn't like.

  • Have a lot going for oneself: When we want to indicate that someone has many advantages:

With all the intelligence, beauty and generosity, you have a lot going for you.

  • What goes around comes around: This one is used to mean how someone treats others is a reflection of how people will treat them later:

Although I feel bad for her, what goes around comes around.

  • Do not even go there: When we want to indicate that we are no interested in talking about a particular subject, we use this:

A : So, I've heard that you and Lucy had had a terrible fight recently.

B : Oh, do not even go there!

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