Take

You have probably heard 'Take' many times in English. In this lesson, we are going to learn all about it.

'Take' is a commonly used verb in English. In this lesson, we will uncover all there is about it.

Functions of 'Take'

'Take' as the Main Verb

One of the main functions of 'take' is to be the main verb in sentences. Below, we are going to learn all about its different meanings:

Use

  • When we want to indicate that we carry an object from one place to another, we use 'take':

Do you mind taking this table over there?

Here, it is showing movement.

If she really wants to help, she can take the baby.

  • When we want to indicate going with someone from one place to another, we can use 'take':

I don't want you to take your sister wherever you go.

Since it's too late and dark, I can take you by car.

  • When we want to indicate that we want to use a form of transport, path, etc. we use this verb:

John wants to take the bus now.

Hannah, If you wanna take the train, you'd better hurry.

  • When we want to take a picture of someone/something, we use 'take':

Excuse me, could you take a few pictures of us?

They are photographers; They take photographs of anything they consider beautiful.

  • When we want to show that we are holding something or reaching someone/something:

Anna, I will distract him so you can take the bag and run.

She took the child and left without a goodbye.

  • When we want to indicate that we are removing something, we use 'take':

Take your coat off, would you?

The mayor has demanded that billboard be taken down.

  • We can also use 'take' to show that something was removed without the permission of the owner:

The thieves took all our money and jewelry last night.

How dare you take my passport without me knowing?

  • When we want to show we are taking something from a specific source, we use 'take':

The podcaster takes information right from this book.

He takes his electricity from that building.

  • When we want to show that something can contain a limited number of things/people:

The airplane can take 550 passengers.

Do you think this van can take 20 people this far?

  • When we want to indicate that we want to capture someone/something:

The Moghuls took the whole country in the end.

As you can see, it indicates that they have power over a particular place.

The enemy took my husband prisoner for six months.

Position in a Sentence

As mentioned above, since 'take' is functioning as the main verb here, it mainly comes after the subject. Please note that whenever we have an imperative sentence, we use the main verb at the beginning of the sentence. Look at the following examples:

Anna wants to take the dog out and walk it.

We have successfully taken down the riots.

Take this desk over there.

Here, we have an imperative sentence so the verb is used at the beginning of the sentence.

'Take' as the Dummy Verb

'Take' can also be used as a dummy verb in different contexts. Dummy verbs come with particular nouns and their meanings are entirely changed. Look at the following list below for more clarification:

  • When we want to show that we are taking someone/something to the next level, stage, etc. We mainly use an adverb/preposition after the object here. Look:

So, I have decided to take our relationship to the next level.

The manager finally said that we could take the case forward later that evening.

  • When we want to indicate that something takes a specific amount of time, we can use 'take':

It takes about a year and a half to completely heal from your traumatic relationship.

Don't worry, it will take only a few minutes.

  • When we want to show that we want to sit somewhere, we se 'take':

Can I take this seat, ma'am?

Hannah took the seat across from him and started talking to him reasonably.

  • When we want to show that we want to eat, drink something, we use 'take':

My friend used to take drugs sometimes.

Some people do not like to take sugar with their coffee.

  • When we want to write something down, we use 'take'. Look:

Did the officer take your name?

I didn't take that many notes this session.

  • When we have have a test, we can use 'take' to refer to it:

We would love to come but my daughter has to take an important test tomorrow morning.

The class will have to take a test again next week.

  • When we want to talk about the subject we are studying in university, college, etc. we use 'take':

I may want to take a literary course again this semester.

It feels like it was just yesterday when I took different gym classes.

  • When we want to do something, or deal with it, we use 'take'. Here, it mainly comes with the noun 'action':

Isn't she going to take action and something about his sarcastic comments?

Since this one isn't working, we may have to take a different approach to solve it.

  • When we are measuring something, we can us 'take' to refer to it:

Take his temperature while I gather the doctors .

The kind nurse patiently took his blood pressure.

  • When we want to select something to buy, rent, etc. we use 'take':

Then, I'll take the purple umbrella.

So, which house did you finally agreed to take?

  • When we want to indicate that we accept something, we use 'take'. Here, we can use nouns like 'responsibility', 'blame', 'advice', etc.:

The only way to get her back is to take full responsibility for your actions and change.

Here, it means that one must be responsible for what they do.

Why did Sarah take the blame when she was the innocent one?

I hate it when people say 'you didn't take my advice', like I was to be told what to do and what not to do.

I would really be glad if you took this reward .

  • When we want to show that we used the opportunity provided to use, we can us 'take'. It mainly comes with 'opportunity', 'risk', 'chance', etc:

She took the opportunity to call her mom.

We must all take risks if we want to live the life we want.

  • When we are performing an action, we can use take with nouns like 'breath', 'break', 'bath', 'shower', 'look' and etc. Look:

My mom is going to take a shower, so she will call you in the afternoon.

You should avoid taking naps after eating.

It's ok for employees to take a short break during work hours.

  • When we want to accept a customer, a patient, etc. we use 'take':

This university only takes girls.

As you can see, the sentence indicates that no boys are allowed to study in this university.

I'm afraid the doctor will not take any more patients for today.

  • When we want to show that we can tolerate something, we can use 'take'. Look:

You mother cannot take criticism at all.

Here, it means that that person reacts badly to criticism.

Why do you take everything so seriously?

  • When we want to indicate that we want to consider something in a specific way, we use 'take':

So, how did you take Mark's comments on your article?

Martha took her friend's remark as a compliment.

  • When we want to show our feelings or opinions on something/someone, we use 'take'. Look:

Don't take offence at what I told you the other day, though.

As you can see, the sentence is showing that 'no insult' was meant.

Harriet takes great interest in reading old literary classics.

Here, 'take' has the same meaning as being interested in a particular thing.

  • In mathematics, when we want to reduce a number from another, we use 'take':

If we take 7 from 44, we will have 37.

Take 7 from 7 and you are left with 0.

  • When we want to introduce someone/something as an example, we use 'take':

Take Harry and Michelle. They are the best when it comes to marriage hardships and responsibilities.

Lots of long-term friends can have conflicts. Take Ida and Harriet.

  • When we want to show that something is going to take a specific form or take a position of something, we use 'take':

Our next meeting will take the form of a lecture.

The next leader will take office in 5 months.

  • When something is needed to happen or be done, we use 'take':

I don't think it takes much to make him happy, Hannah.

It only takes a stupid person like him to go back to his toxic partner.

  • When we want to show our size in shoes and clothing, we use 'take':

What size shoes does your son take?

I always take small size t-shirts.

Position in a Sentence

Since we use 'take' as a dummy verb here, it must come before a particular noun. Otherwise, its meaning will be completely different. Look at the following examples:

I think I need to take a break from life.

Here, if we remove 'break', the sentence will remain incomplete.

Can Sally ever take criticism kindly?

So, are you guys ready to take your relationship to the next level?

Idioms and Expressions

We have several idioms and expressions with 'take'. Below, we are going to learn all about them:

  • Someone can take it or leave it: When we want to show that someone does not care about doing something, we use this idiom:

Writing? I can take it or leave it.

Coffee now? They can take it or leave it.

  • To have what it takes: When we have the necessary abilities or qualities needed to do something, we use this idiom:

She has all it takes to face the truth.

The Aldens have what it takes to control their emotions in difficult times.

  • Take something/someone as it/they come: When we want to accept someone/someone as they are:

Take her as she comes and stop fighting with her.

Take life as it comes because overthinking it will not help you.

  • Take it out of someone: When we want to show that someone is mentally or physically ill, we use this:

Pulling yourself out of a mentally dark place really takes it out of you.

Caring too much for other people really takes it out of you.

  • Take it: When we want to show our supposition, or guess, we can use this idiom:

I take it that you don't like him that much.

I take it that I will not see you again, right?

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