Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar

Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar

This is one of the most advanced tenses in the English language. So, congratulation for reaching this level. Let's start to learn this tense.

Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar

Future Perfect Continuous

The future perfect continuous tense is like the future perfect tense. Their difference is that the future perfect simple normally focuses on the result of the activity, and the future perfect continuous normally focuses on the process of the activity and it expresses longer actions. The future perfect continuous refers ongoing actions that will be finished at some future time. Normally we have a time expression in the sentence.

Future Perfect Continuous: Structure

The future perfect continuous is composed of the auxiliary verb 'will', the auxiliary verb 'have' and the past participle of the verb 'be' and the present participle of the main verb.

Subject auxiliary will auxiliary have past participle of be present participle of main verb
All subjects will have been verb+ing

When we use the future perfect tense in speaking, we often contract the subject and auxiliary verb 'will'.

He will have been studying for three hours . → He'll have been studying for three hours .

In three years , he will have been teaching for thirty years . → In three years , he'll have been teaching for thirty years .

Future Perfect Continuous: Negation

For negative sentences you put 'not' between the auxiliary verb 'will' and the the auxiliary verb 'have'.

In three year , he will have been teaching for thirty years . → In three year , he will not have been teaching for thirty years .

In negative sentences, we can contract the auxiliary verb 'will' and 'not'. See the examples:

In three year , he will not have been teaching for thirty years . → In three year , he won't have been teaching for thirty years .

Future Perfect Continuous: Questions

For yes/no question sentences, we exchange the subject and 'will'. Look at these example sentences with the future perfect continuous tense:

In three year , he will have been teaching for thirty years . → In three year , will he have been teaching for thirty years ?

For wh- question sentences, do the exact thing you do for yes/no questions and add the proper wh- question word at the beginning of the sentence and omit the part that is the answer.

She will have been studying at NYY . → Where will she have been studying ?

Present Participle: Spelling Rules

We make the Present Participle by adding -ing to the verb. Normally we just add -ing. But sometimes we have to change the word a little. Here are the rules to help you know how to spell the Present Participle:

  • If the verb ends in consonant + stressed vowel + consonant, double the last letter.

stop → stopping

run → running

  • If the verb ends in consonant + unstressed vowel + consonant, (the base verb is not stressed) do not double the last letter.

open → opening

  • If the verb ends in 'ie', change the 'ie' to 'y'.

lie → lying

die → dying

  • If the verb ends in vowel + consonant + 'e', omit the 'e'.

come → coming

mistake → mistaking

Future Perfect Continuous: Uses

When someone uses the future perfect continuous, they are talking about:

an Unfinished Action

  1. We use the future perfect continuous tense to talk about an ongoing action which continues up to another point in the future. We need 'for + length of time'.

In three year , he will have been teaching for thirty years .

I will have been waiting for the bus for two hours by 9 : 00 .

a Finished Action

  • We use the future perfect continuous tense to talk about an action in the future that finishes just before another time or action.

When you come over , I'll have been studying ; therefore , I'll be exhausted .

When I come at nine o'clock , will you have been studying long ?

When Not to Use Future Perfect Continuous Tense

We do not normally use the continuous with stative verbs (also called non-continuous verbs). These verbs are normally used in the simple form because they refer to states, rather than actions or progresses. Use the simple present perfect with verbs such as 'know, hate, hear, understand, want'.

In June , I will have known (NOT will have been knowing) you for two months .

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