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Grammar tag

Demonstrative Pronouns

A demonstrative pronoun is a pronoun mostly used to point to something based on its distance from the speaker. In English, these pronouns have four forms.

 

Demonstrative Determiners

Demonstrative determiners in English are this, these, that and those. They are used to identify the person or thing that is being referred to.

 

They vs. These or Those

'These' and 'Those' are called plural demonstratives. We use them as determiners and pronouns. But are they interchangeable with the plural pronoun 'they'?

 

That vs. Those

'That' and 'those' are both demonstratives. They point to a specific noun in a sentence. Here we will briefly look at their similarities and differences.

 

These vs. Those

These/those are the plural forms of this/that. They're called demonstratives. We use them to identify specific persons or things close to or far from us.

 

Them vs. These or Those

'These' and 'Those' are called plural demonstratives. They can be subjects or objects. 'Them' is an object pronoun. So, can they be interchangeable?

 

Those Days or These Days

What is the correct choice, 'one of these days' or 'one of those days'? Are they both correct but mean the same thing? Or Do they have different meanings?

 

Those

'Those' is a plural demonstrative pronoun. In this part, we will go through its uses and grammatical rules in English grammar.

 

Such vs. These or Those

The words “such” and “these” are often confused with each other due to their nature of supporting a sentence where similar situations are being mentioned.

 
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