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Compound Adverbs - Temporal Expressions

Discover how compound adverbs like "all along" and "up ahead" convey temporal expressions in English.

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Compound Adverbs
all along

from the beginning or continuously throughout a period of time

[Adverb]
as long as

used to express that a condition must be met for something to happen or be true

[Adverb]
as per usual

used to indicate that something is happening or being done in the usual or customary way

[Adverb]
as yet

up to the present time

[Adverb]
by and by

used to indicate that something will happen or be accomplished eventually or after a period of time

[Adverb]
up ahead

used to refer to a point in the future or a specific moment that is coming soon

[Adverb]
at present

at the current moment or during the existing time

[Adverb]
for the time being

for a limited period, usually until a certain condition changes

[Adverb]
in due course

at the appropriate or expected time, without rushing or delay

[Adverb]
in the first place

used to explain the main reason or starting point of a situation

[Adverb]
in the nick of time

only a few moments before it is still possible to get something done or avoid something bad from happening

[Adverb]
as soon as

used to indicate that something will happen immediately after a certain condition or event occurs

[conjunction]
at this point in time

used to emphasize the present moment in relation to the topic under discussion

[conjunction]
at that point in time

used to emphasize a specific moment or period in history or a past event

[conjunction]
on time

exactly at the specified or expected time

[Adverb]
in time

after a period of time

[Adverb]
in a tick

in a short amount of time

[phrase]
anytime soon

used to indicate that something is not expected to happen in the near future or immediately

[phrase]
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