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Words Related to Cinema and Theater - Theatrical Genres and Styles

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Words Related to Cinema and Theater
comedy
[noun]
professional entertainment that contains jokes and sketches, intended to make people laugh
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fringe theatre
[noun]
plays, often written by new writers, challenging the conventional ways of thinking and having a new and unusual form
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masque
[noun]
an amateur play in verse including music and dancing by masked performers that was very popular among the aristocracy in England during the 16th and 17th centuries
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morality play
[noun]
a kind of drama in which the performers personify an abstract concept as an allegory presenting a didactic point, popular in the 15th and 16th centuries
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experimental theater
[noun]
a style that challenges traditional theatrical conventions by exploring new forms of expression and presentation
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commedia dell'arte
[noun]
a form of Italian theater that originated in the 16th century and is characterized by its use of stock characters, improvised dialogue, and physical comedy
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mystery play
[noun]
a kind of play popular in the Middle Ages that was based on the holy scripture or the events in the lives of Christian saints
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postmodern theater
[noun]
a late 20th century style of theater that is self-reflexive, often fragmented, blurs the lines between reality and fiction, and emphasizes the role of the audience in creating meaning
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postdramatic theater
[noun]
a style that challenges traditional dramatic conventions and instead focuses on the sensory and emotional experience of the audience
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in-yer-face theater
[noun]
a confrontational style of British theater known for its shocking subject matter, explicit language, and graphic content
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grand guignol
[noun]
a style of French theater that originated in the late 19th century and is known for its use of graphic horror, violence, and gore, often combined with humor and satire
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nativity play
[noun]
a play recreating the story of the birth of Jesus Christ, performed by children at Christmas
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improvisational theater
[noun]
a form of theater in which everything is created spontaneously by the performers, without a script or pre-planned storyline
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physical theater
[noun]
a style of theater that emphasizes the use of the body, movement, and nonverbal communication as the primary means of storytelling and expression
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bouffon
[noun]
a style of physical theater that satirizes social and political issues through exaggerated, grotesque performances and audience interaction
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Harlequinade
[noun]
a traditional theatrical genre that originated in Italy and features the character of Harlequin as the main protagonist in a comedy of love and mistaken identity
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Bunraku
[noun]
a traditional form of Japanese puppet theater that features intricately crafted puppets, live musicians, and narrators who tell stories of love, tragedy, and historical events
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street theater
[noun]
a type of theater that takes place in public spaces, often featuring political or social themes and aimed at engaging audiences who may not typically attend traditional theater
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immersive theater
[noun]
a type of theater that seeks to immerse the audience in the world of the play, often featuring site-specific performances and interactive elements
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tragedy
[noun]
a play with sad events, especially one that the main character dies at the end
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interactive theater
[noun]
a type of theater that invites audience participation and engagement, blurring the boundaries between performers and spectators
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epic theater
[noun]
a type of theater that seeks to provoke social and political change, often featuring theatrical devices that distance the audience from the action
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tragicomedy
[noun]
a dramatic piece that has both tragic and comic elements
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musical theater
[noun]
a play or film whose action and dialogue is interspersed with singing and dancing
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absurdism
[noun]
a type of theater characterized by the senselessness and meaninglessness of existence, often featuring plots that defy logic and language
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surrealism
[noun]
a type of theater that explores the irrational and subconscious, often featuring dreamlike or bizarre elements
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expressionism
[noun]
a theatrical style characterized by exaggeration, distortion, and symbolism, often used to explore complex psychological states and emotions
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naturalism
[noun]
a style of theater that attempts to recreate reality as closely as possible, often featuring realistic sets and props, and exploring themes of social injustice
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melodrama
[noun]
a type of theater characterized by exaggerated emotions and simplistic morality, often featuring stock characters and featuring music to heighten the emotional impact
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Restoration theater
[noun]
a form of theater that emerged in England during the Restoration period, featuring comedies of manners and bawdy humor
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Elizabethan theater
[noun]
a type of theater that emerged in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, characterized by plays that combined tragedy, comedy, and history, and featuring prominent playwrights such as William Shakespeare
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Medieval theater
[noun]
a form of theater that developed in Europe during the Middle Ages, often performed in churches or on traveling carts, and featuring morality plays and miracle plays
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playback theater
[noun]
a type of theater in which performers invite members of the audience to share personal stories, which are then re-enacted on stage
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site-specific theater
[noun]
a type of theater that is created for and performed in a specific location, often outside of traditional theater spaces
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devised theater
[noun]
a type of theater in which performers work collaboratively to create a new piece of theatre, often without a pre-existing script
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verbatim theater
[noun]
a type of theater that uses the actual words spoken by people interviewed on a particular subject as the basis for a script, often dealing with contemporary social and political issues
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physical comedy
[noun]
a comedic performance that uses exaggerated body movements and physical actions for humor, often involving slapstick and visual gags
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political theater
[noun]
type of theater that focuses on political themes and issues, often aimed at advocating social change or critiquing the status quo
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Ancient Greek theater
[noun]
a theatrical tradition that emerged in ancient Greece featuring plays that explored themes of tragedy and comedy, often performed in amphitheaters
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drama
[noun]
a genre of literature, film, or television that deals with serious or emotional themes, often involving conflicts and tensions between characters
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