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Describing Qualities - Describing Qualities

Discover how English idioms like "off the rails" and "a sight for sore eyes" relate to describing qualities in English.

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English Idioms used to Describe Qualities
(as) still as a stone

used to refer to a person or thing that is completely motionless

[phrase]
(as) heavy as lead

used to refer to someone or something that is very difficult to lift or move, due to being heavy

[phrase]
(as) light as a feather

used to refer to someone or something that is very easy to lift and carry, due to having no considerable weight

[phrase]
in the raw

(of a thing) in its most natural or true state of existence

[phrase]
a sight for sore eyes

a person or thing that is very strange or unattractive in appearance

[phrase]
off the rails

used to say that something is extreme or exciting

[phrase]
Old Harry

the devil or any character that has similarities to it

[noun]
snail mail

mail that is delivered physically by the postal system as opposed to email and other electronic means

[noun]
a bunch of fives

a person's fist

[phrase]
AWOL

referring to something that is stolen or not in its usual place

[Adjective]
to get a hold of sth

to find a thing that one was searching for

[phrase]
to lay one's hands on sth

to succeed in obtaining something

[phrase]
up for grabs

ready to be used or obtained

[phrase]
to go spare

to be available for use only due to being unwanted

[phrase]
crystal clear

(of an object) clear or thin enough for one to be able to see through it

[phrase]
old school

adhering to traditional values, methods, or styles

[phrase]
knee-high to a grasshopper

extremely or unusually small in size or importance

[phrase]
(as) pretty as a picture

very appealing to the eyes

[phrase]
(as) silent as the grave

used to refer to a place that is completely silent or quiet, with no noise or sound at all

[phrase]
(as) American as apple pie

used of someone or something that is seen or considered very normal in America

[phrase]
off the rails

used to say that something is not following the planned or expected course

[phrase]
along the line of sth

in alignment with a specific path, course, or set of guidelines within a given context or framework

[phrase]
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