FAQ

Frequently asked questions

FAQ

Frequently asked questions
FAQ

Pronouns

97 articles

In this part, we will look at some of the problematic areas about pronouns, their functions and their differences in usage.

I vs. Me

'I' and 'me' are both words that mean the same thing, but each one must be used in a different circumstance. To know about this issue, start here.

 

Me vs. Myself

'Me' and 'myself' both are objects, and both refer to the same person, but they cannot be used in place of one another.

 

I vs. Myself

Do you know what is the difference between 'I' and 'Myself'? They are both pronouns, both refer to the same person. But they are not interchangeable. Why?

 

You Singular or Plural

For 2nd person singular and plural, formal or informal, we only have one pronoun in English today. So aren't you curious to know how do we tell the difference?

 

You vs. Yourself

'Yourself' is a second person singular reflexive pronoun, 'you' is the second person personal pronoun both singular and plural. Can they be interchangeable?

 

He vs. Him

Which one is grammatically correct? 'I invited his parents, his girlfriend and he?' or 'I invited his parents, his girlfriend and him?' Let's find out!

 

He vs. His

'He' and 'his' are two examples of gender-specific words in the English language. One is a personal pronoun, the other is a possessive determiner and pronoun.

 

He and I or Him and I

'He and I' or 'Him and I'? Is one of them the correct choice? Or they are both wrong? Let's find out.

 

She vs. He

As you might've known already, 'he' and 'she' are the only gender-specific personal pronouns in the English language. Here, we'll explain them in more detail.

 

She and I vs. She and Me

What is the difference between 'she and I' and 'she and me'? Can we use both options? Or none of them is correct? Let's find out!

 

It vs. This

'It' and 'this' are both pronouns, but they are not synonymous. Here, we will discuss their similarities and differences.

 

It vs. They

'It' and 'they' are both personal pronouns. If you want to know what are their uses and functions under different circumstances, don't waste another second!

 

It vs. Them

'It' and 'They' are both pronouns, but what is the difference between 'it' and 'they'? Here we will discuss the differences and similarities of the two.

 

He vs. They

What should we choose when we do not want to be explicit about gender specificity? Well, in this lesson, you will learn about the new pronoun in English!

 

She vs. They

In writing academically or speaking formally, it is important that you don’t distinguish between genders. Here we will learn how!

 

She vs. Her

'She' and 'her' are both pronouns that are used to refer to nouns describing female persons and animals. To know their similarities and differences, click here!

 

It vs. He and She

'It', 'she', and 'he' are personal pronouns that show person and number. 'He' and 'she' also show gender. Read this article to know these three pronouns.

 

We vs. Us

'We' is a subject pronoun used as the subject of sentences. 'Us' is an object pronoun used as an object in a sentence. But can they be interchangeable?

 

We vs. They

'We are the working class.' 'They are the upper class'. We use 'we' to refer to a group we feel belonged to and use 'they' when we feel a social distance.

 

Singular They: Is or Are

'Singular they' is a relatively new personal pronoun that has been introduced in modern English. It's singular, but are we suppose to use singular verbs or not?

 

They vs. Them

'They' and 'them' are both third-person plural pronouns and refer to plural nouns. But what is their main difference? Let's find out!

 

They, Singular or Plural

Is 'They' a singular or a plural pronoun? The answer to this question used to be so easy. We would've said yes. But it's more complicated than that.

 

They vs. Their

'They' and 'them' are both refer to a group of people, but they function differently in a sentence because they take different grammatical roles.

 

They vs. These or Those

'These' and 'Those' are called plural demonstratives. We use them as determiners and pronouns. But are they interchangeable with the plural pronoun 'they'?

 

This vs. That

'This' and 'that' are singular demonstratives. 'This' is used to point to a noun being close to us and 'that' is used to refer to something far from us.

 

This vs. These

'This' and 'these' are both demonstratives. They point to a specific noun in a sentence. Here we will briefly look at their similarities and differences.

 

That vs. Which

In the English language, we have three main relative pronouns: who, which, that. Here, we will discuss the similarities and differences between the last two.

 

That vs. Those

'That' and 'those' are both demonstratives. They point to a specific noun in a sentence. Here we will briefly look at their similarities and differences.

 

That vs. Who or Whom

'Who', 'whom', and 'that' are all relative pronouns. Two of them are used as a subject and one of them is the object. If you want to which is which, read this!

 

These vs. Those

These/those are the plural forms of this/that. They're called demonstratives. We use them to identify specific persons or things close to or far from us.

 

Them vs. These or Those

'These' and 'Those' are called plural demonstratives. They can be subjects or objects. 'Them' is an object pronoun. So, can they be interchangeable?

 

Those Days or These Days

What is the correct choice, 'one of these days' or 'one of those days'? Are they both correct but mean the same thing? Or Do they have different meanings?

 

One and Ones

'One' and 'ones' are impersonal pronouns in English. They're used in place of previously mentioned nouns to avoid repetition.

 

One vs. You

If we want to talk about people in general, can we say, 'You must be responsible toward the environment' or 'one must be responsible toward the environment?'

 

Mine vs. My Own

'This is a duty of mine'. 'This is a duty of my own.' Which one of these sentences do you think is correct? Can we use both of them? What is the difference?

 

Mine vs. Mine's

'My' is the possessive adjective and 'mine' is the possessive pronoun, but what grammatical category does "mine's" fall under? Let's find out!

 

His vs. He's

"His" and "He's" are what we call 'homophones'. It means having the same pronunciation but different meanings or spelling. So what is their difference?

 

His or Her vs. Their

In the modern day and age, writers are looking for ways to write generic sentences without using gender-based pronouns. One of the ways is to use 'their'.

 

His vs. Him

We have different kinds of pronouns in English grammar, for example, subject, object, possessive, impersonal, etc. Here, we will discuss two masculine pronouns.

 

Its vs. It's

What is the difference between "its" and "it's"? How can we use each of them? Are they the same thing? Here, we will discuss the differences between them.

 

Its vs. Their

Can we replace 'its' with 'their'? If yes, when can we do this? To know if they are truly interchangeable or not, don't waste another minute and read this part.

 

Its vs. His or Hers

Can we use 'its' instead of 'his' or 'hers'? If so, when? Are they truly interchangeable? To understand more about these pronouns, read this part.

 

Ours vs. Us

What is the difference between 'ours' and 'us'? They are both pronouns. They are both first-person plurals. But they are of different categories of pronouns.

 

Ours vs. Ourselves

What is the difference between 'ours' and 'ourselves'? 'He's a friend of ours,' or 'He's a friend of ourselves'. Which of these two sentences is correct?

 

Ours vs. Theirs

'Ours' and 'Theirs' are both what we call possessive pronouns. They are used to refer to something or someone belonging to or associated with us or others.

 

Mine, Pronoun or Adjective?

In this part, we will discuss the word 'mine' in the English language. We'll see its part of speech, uses, and functions in a sentence.

 

Yours vs. Your's

'Yours sincerely' or 'Your's sincerely'? Which one do you think is correct? Here, we will discuss the second-person possessive pronoun in the English language.

 

Hers vs. Her's

'A friend of hers' or 'a friend of her's?' Which one do you think is the correct choice? In this part, we will discuss the possessive pronoun 'hers'.

 

Ours vs. Our's

'a friend of ours' or 'a friend of our's?' Which one do you think is the correct choice? In this part, we will discuss the possessive pronoun 'ours'.

 

Theirs vs. Their's

Which one do you think is correct? Here, we will discuss the third-person plural possessive pronoun in the English language.

 

Theirs vs. Them

What is the difference between 'them' and 'theirs?' 'Theirs' is the third person plural possessive pronoun. 'Them' is a third-person pronoun. What else?

 

Theirs vs. Their

What is the difference between 'theirs' and 'their'? They're both pronouns. They're both third-person plurals. But they are of different categories of pronouns.

 

Theirs vs. There's

"Theirs" and "There's" are examples of homophones in the English language. Homophones are words with the same pronunciation but different meanings.

 

Anybody vs. Anyone

When should we use 'anybody' versus 'anyone'? What is their difference? Are they have the same meaning? Let's find out!

 

Anybody vs. Somebody

'Anybody' and 'somebody' are indefinite pronouns that refer to people without saying exactly who they are. Here, we will discuss 'anybody' and 'somebody'.

 

Anybody vs. Nobody

Both 'anybody' and 'nobody' are what we call indefinite pronouns in the English language. But what is their difference? Are they interchangeable?

 

Anybody vs. Any Body

'Anybody' is an indefinite pronoun. But what about 'any body?' Is 'any body' correct? If so, what does it mean? Here, we will discuss these two words.

 

Anybody vs. Everybody

What is the difference between the two indefinite pronouns of 'anybody' and 'everybody'? In this part, we will go through their meanings one by one.

 

Anybody vs. Anybody Else

What is the difference between 'anybody' and 'anybody else'? What does the adverb 'else' mean in this phrase? Here, we will discuss these two.

 

Anyone vs. Any One

Are 'anyone' and 'any one' both correct words in English? Do they have the same meaning? Can we use them interchangeably? Let's find out.

 

Anyone vs. Someone

'Anyone' and 'someone' are both indefinite pronouns that refer to an unidentified person. But despite their similarities, are they identical?

 

Anyone vs. Anyone Else

What is the difference between 'anyone' and 'anyone else'? Do they have different meanings? Here, we will discuss these two.

 

Nobody vs. No One

Is there any difference between the words 'nobody' and 'no one'? Can we use them interchangeably? Here we will explain their differences and similarities.

 

Nobody vs. No Body

'No body understands' or 'Nobody understands'? Are both these sentences correct? Do they have the same meaning? Let's see.

 

Nobody vs. Somebody

What is the difference between the two indefinite pronouns of 'nobody' and 'somebody'? Where can we use each one of them. Let's find out.

 

Nobody vs. None

Is there a difference between the words 'none' and 'nobody'? Can they be used interchangeably? Here, we will go through these two words.

 

Nobody vs. Nobodies

Can 'nobody' be used as a plural pronoun? Or it should always be used as a singular noun? Here, we will see if 'nobody' can be pluralized or not?

 

No One vs. Anyone

'No one' and 'anyone' are both indefinite pronouns that are used to refer to no person or thing in particular. Here, we will discuss these two pronouns.

 

No One vs. None

What is the difference between 'no one' and 'none'? Do they have the same meaning? Let's discuss these two indefinite pronouns and see for ourselves.

 

No One vs. No-one

'No one seemed to notice' or 'no-one seemed to notice? Are both sentences correct? Is there a difference between these two sentences?

 

Everybody vs. Everyone

What is the difference between 'everyone' and 'everybody'? 'Everyone' and 'everybody' have the same meaning in dictionaries. But are they really the same?

 

Everybody vs. Every Body

Are 'Everybody' and 'Every Body' both correct words in English? Do they have the same meaning? Can we use them interchangeably? Let's find out.

 

Everybody vs. Everybodies

Can 'Everybody' be used as a plural pronoun? Or it should always be used as a singular noun? Here, we will see if 'Everybody' can be pluralized or not?

 

Everyone vs. Every One

Are 'Everyone' and 'Every One' both correct words in English? Do they have the same meaning? Can we use them interchangeably? Let's find out.

 

Everyone vs. All

'Everyone' and 'all' have a similar meaning when talking about people. They both mean all the people in a group'. But are they 100% the same?

 

Everyone vs. Every One of Us

'Everyone' and 'every one of us' both refer to 'every individual member of a complete group'. But are they interchangeable? Let's see.

 

Somebody vs. Someone

What is the difference between 'someone' and 'somebody'? Do they have the same meaning? Can they be used interchangeably? Let's find out.

 

Somebody vs. Somebodies

'Somebody' is a singular indefinite pronoun. But can it be used in plural form? Does it mean the same thing? Let's see.

 

Somebody vs. Everybody

'Somebody' and 'everybody' are both what we call indefinite pronouns. Here, we will learn about their similarities and differences.

 

Somebody vs. Somebody Else

What is the difference between these two sentences? 'Ask somebody for help'. And 'Ask somebody else for help'. Let's see.

 

Someone vs. Everyone

'Someone' and 'everyone' are both indefinite pronouns that refer to unspecified persons. Here, we will discuss their similarities and differences.

 

Someone vs. Some One

Is there a difference between 'someone' and 'some one'? Can 'some one' also be used as an indefinite pronoun? Let's check them out.

 

Someone vs. Something

What is the difference between the two indefinite pronouns 'someone' and 'something'? Can they be used interchangeably?

 

Someone vs. Someone Else

What is the difference in meaning when we add the adverb 'else' to the indefinite pronoun 'someone'? To find out the difference between the two, read this part!

 

Anything vs. Everything

'Anything' and 'everything' are both pronouns that are used to refer to something. They have fairly similar spelling and structure, but what's their difference?

 

Anything vs. Any Thing

Are 'anything' and 'any thing' both acceptable words in standard English? If yes, are they interchangeable? If no, which one is correct?

 

Anything vs. Something

In this part, we are going to discuss the meanings and uses of 'something' and 'anything'. We will look at their similarities and differences.

 

Anything vs. Nothing

'Nothing' and 'anything' are two indefinite pronouns that have similar meanings. But they are used differently in a sentence. Let's check these two out!

 

Anything vs. Anyone

'Anything' and 'anyone' are two indefinite pronouns that have somehow similar spelling but they refer to different things. Let's see their differences.

 

Anything vs. Anything Else

What is the difference between 'anything' and 'anything else'? Do they have the same meaning? Let's see their similarities and differences.

 

Anything vs. Anythings

Can 'anything' as an indefinite pronoun be used in plural form? Is 'anythings' correct in standard English? Let's find out.

 

Nothing vs. Something

'Something' and 'nothing' can be considered two opposite indefinite pronouns in the English grammar. To know about their differences, read this article!

 

Nothing vs. No Thing

In this part we will discuss the different spelling of nothing with and without space between the two parts and we'll see which one is correct and more useful.

 

Nothing vs. Not Anything

One of the differences between 'nothing' and 'anything' is that the former is a negative making indefinite pronoun and the former is not. Let's discuss them!

 

Everything vs. Every Thing

Everything is considered one word and it is an indefinite pronoun. But what about its alternate spelling with space between the two parts? Is it also correct?

 

Everything vs. All

'Everything' is an indefinite pronoun but 'all' can take many different parts of speech in a sentence. Here we will compare these two words.

 

Everything vs. All Things

'Everything' is a singular indefinite pronoun. 'All things' is a plural noun phrase. Judging by this fact, let's go through their similarities and differences.